Tag: phones

Verizon customers can now access the carrier’s 5G network in the US from yet another smartphone.


CNN.com – RSS Channel – App Tech Section

The Samsung Galaxy Fold is launching next week as planned, despite reports from some early reviewers that their devices broke after just a few days of use. Here’s why it doesn’t matter.


CNN.com – RSS Channel – App Tech Section

Smart sports technology can give instant feedback about performance, such as this attachment from Zepp that fits onto a bat.
Smart sports technology can give instant feedback about performance, such as this attachment from Zepp that fits onto a bat.

  • Sensors are being put into basketballs, soccer balls, baseball bats and tennis rackets
  • They make it possible for casual players to get pro-level feedback on performance
  • A connected racket can tell you how hard you hit the ball and where it landed on the racket

(CNN) — After losing a particularly intense game of tennis, you drop your racket and storm off the court. Instead of fuming and reaching for a water bottle, you grab your smartphone to see what went wrong.

There’s a new crop of tools to calculate the speed of a pitch, the strength of a putt, the arch of a basketball toss and the quality of a serve. They aren’t for professional ballplayers or touring golfers. These pro-level gadgets are coming for casual sports, from pickup games to Little League.

The technology that makes it possible is a combination of small, increasingly affordable sensors such as accelerometers and gyroscopes. Smartphones are packed with them, and they’ve helped create the booming fitness tracker industry.

They’ve already changed running and biking, with apps such as Strava and wearables such as Fitbit. Now they’re being placed inside existing sports equipment — tennis rackets, running shoes, basketballs and golf clubs.

Babolat has been making tennis rackets for 20 years. In 2013, it released its first connected racket, the $ 399 Play Pure Drive. Hidden inside the hollow handle of a completely normal looking racket is a trio of sensors that track movements and vibrations. The racket can detect exactly where a ball hits the strings, how much spin the player gives it and how hard it was hit.

Those stats are fed to a colorful smartphone app that displays the information as easy to digest diagrams. The app can also track the length of a game and count the total number of shots, hits and misses.

Similar tools and companion mobile apps are coming out for almost every popular sport.

The 94Fifty basketball looks and feels like a standard-issue ball. Inside, sensors measure the arc of each shot, backspin and the speed and intensity of a player’s dribble. Adidas makes the miCoach Smart Ball, a soccer ball that collects information on each kick. Many of these products are meant for individual practice sessions, not for team games.

Not all sensors need to be built into pricey custom equipment. Zepp makes $ 150 attachments that fit onto the bottom of baseball bats and golf clubs to create a 3-D visual of each swing in the mobile app.

Even smartphone cameras are getting in on the action. Pro athletes have relied on cameras as a training tool for years. Now casual players can do some of the same tricks with the phones, including slow-motion replay.

Velocity by Athla is an app that can turn an iPhone into a speed radar detector. Created by Mike Gillam, a former ER doctor, the $ 7 app calculates the speed of a ball flying through the air using just the camera. Currently, it’s designed to work for baseball, tennis, soccer and cricket.

One challenge these companies face is turning the raw data into actionable, easy-to-understand information. On its own, knowing the speed of a free throw isn’t going to help you make it in the basket. The various apps try to give suggestions on techniques. But they also show how you measure up with other players, even ones halfway around the world.

Performance isn’t just measured in scores versus a single opponent or against past practice sessions, but against everyone who uploads their stats to these apps. The apps double as small social networks of other players, turning real-life matches into long-distance competitions. Sure, you won that pickup game of one-on-one, but perhaps your dribble strength was in the bottom 15% for your age group.

With these sensors showing up in sports equipment and phones turning into pocket coaches, every aspect of performance could eventually be tracked, counted and measured. For nonpros and kids, will all that quantifying suck the fun out of playing sports?

Jean-Marc Zimmerman, CIO of Babolat, said he thinks it’s a natural part of playing any game.

“Today, anybody who’s practicing a sport is usually interested in making progress. We’re in a competitive world; everyone is interested in getting better,” Zimmerman said. “We think it will be more fun to play tennis with the technology than it was before.”




CNN.com – Technology

Is it hip to be flip? The flip phone, an icon of the late '90s and early 2000s, appears to be making a comeback among celebrities, hipsters and millennials. Here's a look at the piece of throwback mobile tech during its heyday.Is it hip to be flip? The flip phone, an icon of the late ’90s and early 2000s, appears to be making a comeback among celebrities, hipsters and millennials. Here’s a look at the piece of throwback mobile tech during its heyday.
NASCAR driver Rusty Wallace talks on a cellular phone during practice for the Daytona 500 in February 1996.NASCAR driver Rusty Wallace talks on a cellular phone during practice for the Daytona 500 in February 1996.
The Motorola MicroTAC Classic was released in 1991 and modeled after the MicroTAC 9800x, which came out in 1989. It was a precursor of the flip phones that would come later.The Motorola MicroTAC Classic was released in 1991 and modeled after the MicroTAC 9800x, which came out in 1989. It was a precursor of the flip phones that would come later.
In this 1995 image, a shepherd chats on a flip phone while looking after his flock.In this 1995 image, a shepherd chats on a flip phone while looking after his flock.
Japanese manufacturer Motorola was perhaps the leader in the mobile space during the flip phones renaissance, particularly with its line of Razr phones, which still get some love to this day.Japanese manufacturer Motorola was perhaps the leader in the mobile space during the flip phones renaissance, particularly with its line of Razr phones, which still get some love to this day.
Actress Hilary Swank uses a flip phone in 2000.Actress Hilary Swank uses a flip phone in 2000.
Aside from flip phones, few things say "early 2000s" like the XFL. In this 2001 image, football legend Dick Butkus, the short-lived league's Director of Football Competition, growls (we're guessing) into his flip phone.Aside from flip phones, few things say “early 2000s” like the XFL. In this 2001 image, football legend Dick Butkus, the short-lived league’s Director of Football Competition, growls (we’re guessing) into his flip phone.
OK, never mind. "Friends" says "early 2000s" better than just about anything. Here's star Matthew Perry in 2002 flipping. OK, never mind. “Friends” says “early 2000s” better than just about anything. Here’s star Matthew Perry in 2002 flipping.
Japanese mobile operator DoCoMo introduced a new mobile phone named Freedom of Mobile Multimedia Access (FOMA) in October, 2001.Japanese mobile operator DoCoMo introduced a new mobile phone named Freedom of Mobile Multimedia Access (FOMA) in October, 2001.
"The Tonight Show" host Jay Leno shows, in 2005, that photos don't require a touch screen. Here, he takes a snap of actor Tom Hanks.“The Tonight Show” host Jay Leno shows, in 2005, that photos don’t require a touch screen. Here, he takes a snap of actor Tom Hanks.
Jerry Jones, owner of the Dallas Cowboys, was spotted recently with an old school flip phone. Cork Gaines, a writer for Business Insider, posted this screen grab on Twitter. Jerry Jones, owner of the Dallas Cowboys, was spotted recently with an old school flip phone. Cork Gaines, a writer for Business Insider, posted this screen grab on Twitter.

  • Among the young and hip, flip phones are making a comeback
  • Motorola popularized flip phones in 1996 with the StarTAC
  • Vogue editor, NFL quarterback among those seen with flip phones
  • Some say it’s about simplifying their lives

(CNN) — Hipsters, rejoice. Next time you ride your fixed-gear bicycle to the the thrift store, where you find a vintage, grease-stained mechanic’s shirt that matches your Rollie Fingers mustache and Grizzly Adams beard, there’s an edgy, if technologically sub-optimal, way to tell your friends about it.

Use a flip phone.

In an age of the iPhone 6 Plus and massive Android phablets, flip phones are inexplicably making a comeback.

No less an arbiter of cool than Vogue magazine editor Anna Wintour has apparently dumped her iPhone in favor of a flipper. Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck, actress Kate Beckinsale and even Rihanna are just a few of the celebrities spotted proudly brandishing the famous piece of paleo-technology.

And, believe it or not, “dumb phones” aren’t exactly the elusive unicorn that some of us think they are.

As of January, 56% of American adults owned smartphones, compared to a total of 90% who had a cellphone of some kind, according to the Pew Research Internet Project. Among millennials age 18-29, an overwhelming 83% of those who owned cellphones had a smartphone, but that leaves the other 17% who keep their mobile life more basic.

The hinged, snap-shut “flipper” form factor was originally introduced to the public in 1982 by laptop manufacturer GriD with its Compass computer.

Motorola, perhaps the king of flip phones with its Razr line, introduced the clamshell style in 1996 with its StarTAC phone (which, appropriately enough, was re-released for nostalgic techies in 2010).

Is this really all about going for retro, hipster street cred? There is, at times, a mystifying aspect of “cool” that centers around eschewing modern convenience for vintage … well … inconvenience.

Writing on typewriters? Check. Racing high-wheel bicycles from the 1880s? Yes. Playing baseball with the rules and equipment of the 1860s? Absolutely.

But there are obviously some more practical reasons some people, including millennials, go flip.

For some, it’s about simplifying and uncluttering in a 24/7 plugged-in society.

“It just seemed like it would be better for my addled brain than a smartphone,” 26-year-old Angelica Baker, a tutor and writer, told TIME. “Personally I’m too scattered and unfocused to handle email and Facebook on my phone.”

Baker swapped out her Droid for her mom’s retired flip phone, a pink Motorola Razr.

No one has to worry about the iCloud being hacked when they use a flip phone. There’s little to no eye and neck strain. No fear of Flappy Bird addiction.

And, let’s be honest … there’s something satisfying about a switchblade-like phone flip after an annoying phone conversation that even the most emphatic tap of a touchscreen will never approach.

Maybe the hipsters are onto something after all. Though we’ll still pass on the bushy beards.




CNN.com – Technology