Zoom is shutting down one of its most popular apps

One of the most widely-used Zoom apps is closing as the company looks to modernize some of its offerings for users around the world.

The video conferencing giant has announced it is shutting its app for Chromebooks, the low-cost machines running Google's ChromeOS that have become incredibly popular among schools and universities.

Users shouldn't fear the loss of Zoom forever though, as the company says it is only making the change in order to build something better.

Zoom on Chromebook

“This app will no longer be officially supported after August 2022. Please use the new Zoom for Chrome PWA to join meetings on ChromeOS,” said a notice in the Zoom app for Chromebooks that has recently begun appearing.

The app is set to close by August 2022, meaning users have a few more weeks of the original offering, which was released during Zoom's heyday in the early weeks and months of the pandemic.

9to5Google, which first spotted the alert, notes that the Zoom app for Chromebooks is pretty basic, only offering standard access to video calls and meetings without any of the added functionality that has been added to other versions of Zoom over the years.

Google had announced back in August 2020 that it would be phasing out Chrome apps on all platforms, with support on Windows, Mac and Linux ending in June 2021. This was later extended to all Chrome apps on ChromeOS for June 2022, with the company no longer accepting new apps, and existing apps no longer being listed or made available to download on the Chrome Web Store.

Zoom had shown off a Progressive Web App (PWA) for Chromebooks in 2021, offering much of the standard functionality familiar to users on other platforms, as well as up to date UI and apps.

The news comes shortly after Zoom recorded a huge rise in enterprise customers to go alongside its consumer base as hybrid working remains popular.

In its most recent financial results, the company said that the number of customers contributing more than $ 100,000 was up 46% year-over-year, as it now has around 198,900 enterprise customers, up 24% from the same quarter in its last fiscal year.

TechRadar – All the latest technology news

Read More

I got married this week, and these five iOS apps helped reduce our stress levels

April 14 was the day that I became a married man. And during the two years spent arranging it, there were a few apps on iOS 15 that we constantly used to make sure everything was paid for, and perfectly scheduled to play its part on the day.

Planning a wedding involves tasks that you would never expect to have to sort out – from agreeing on the music that would play while you sign the marriage certificate, to checking if the right tree logs for the table have been picked up by the best man.

If we didn't have our iPhones and apps at hand, we may have had to hire a wedding planner to avoid the multiple moments of stress we would have inevitably had.

But thankfully, there were five apps that helped us manage big chunks of the wedding that I was not expecting when I proposed back in 2020.

Notes

iOS 15 Wedding Notes

(Image credit: TechRadar)

Apple's Notes app is one I've relied on since the first version of iOS. It's simple, useful, and has always helped remind me of what's needed to be done for certain tasks.

For the wedding, its usefulness went to another level, thanks in part to the ability to manage notes with someone.

Having both of us add and remove checklists across the two years helped a bunch, especially when an update can appear as a push notification.

Things 3

Things 3 Wedding list on iOS 15

(Image credit: TechRadar)

While we had been arranging the wedding since 2020, tasks didn't really ramp up until the beginning of this year, which is where a to-do app came in.

Having tried other apps in this category, such as OmniFocus, Things 3 won out thanks to the quick actions of its Today screen. I could add and remove sudden jobs, and they'd also display in a helpful widget on my iPhone.

It's not just available on your iPhone for $ 9.99 / £9.99 / AU$ 11.99, it's also available on the iPad for $ 19.99 / £19.99 / AU$ 24.99, and on the Mac priced at $ 49.99 / £29.99 / AU$ 59.99.

Being reminded to pay for a photo booth or to decide on types of flowers in Things was a big help. In fact, it was so helpful I've expanded it to other aspects of my life, including my job at TechRadar, and hobbies like, embarrassingly, weekly Fortnite challenges.

Shazam

iOS 15 Shazam Playlist

(Image credit: TechRadar)

Spotify and Apple Music are two apps I've constantly used for the last decade. I still pay for iTunes Match, which is a yearly service that allows me to host all the music content that I owned on my iPod.

For the wedding itself, we found Spotify useful in arranging the entire playlist from start to finish, mainly due to the ability to have collaborative playlists.

This allowed us to add and remove songs in a playlist as we pleased, with our initials letting each of us know who added the most embarrassing song of the evening.

However, Shazam was most useful in helping us discover artists and tracks that we never would have considered. Going to wedding fayres and shops we heard a lot of music and by using Shazam to discover what the titles were, we could add them to our Spotify and Apple Music playlists.

It's a handy app that can help bolster your music library on whichever music app you use, without being intrusive.

A recent update also allows Shazam to be set up as a shortcut in Control Center on iOS 15, which saves you time before the track stops playing.

Angry Birds

Angry Birds Classic on iOS 15

(Image credit: TechRadar)

For me, managing a wedding is the equivalent of spinning 50 plates while standing on one leg, and reciting the alphabet backward in Spanish.

And that can lead to moments where you just want to escape the planning and the picking, and the paying, and just play a game instead.

This is where I decided to revisit some games thanks to Apple Arcade, and I rediscovered Angry Birds. It was an ideal pick for alleviating some of the frustration that occurred with some suits in February.

The game's maker, Rovio has also re-released the original game on iOS and Android, which I promptly downloaded. Flicking the irate fowl across four worlds on my iPhone 13 Pro turned out to be a great stress reliever while I was on a train to sort out the suits again or deciding on the right type of chairs for the reception.

Monzo Pots

iOS 15 Monzo Pots

(Image credit: TechRadar)

Weddings cost money – lots of money. If you want to make sure that the location or items you had your heart set on for years can be part of your special day, you're going to hear the word deposit a lot until the big day arrives.

It's also a great lesson in managing your funds, which is where a feature from Monzo came in handy for us. Pots are a way of moving money into sections that can't be used by your debit card. They're essentially saving methods without creating a savings account.

You can lock a pot to stop you from withdrawing any money from it, alongside naming it whatever you wish and setting it with a picture. If you want, you can set any transactions to round up the payment to the nearest unit, with the spare change being sent to this pot.

It removes a worry about how much you have ready for the wedding or other saving goals, alongside making sure it's safe from temptation.

TechRadar – All the latest technology news

Read More

I got married this week, and these five iOS apps helped reduce our stress levels

April 14 was the day that I became a married man. And during the two years spent arranging it, there were a few apps on iOS 15 that we constantly used to make sure everything was paid for, and perfectly scheduled to play its part on the day.

Planning a wedding involves tasks that you would never expect to have to sort out – from agreeing on the music that would play while you sign the marriage certificate, to checking if the right tree logs for the table have been picked up by the best man.

If we didn't have our iPhones and apps at hand, we may have had to hire a wedding planner to avoid the multiple moments of stress we would have inevitably had.

But thankfully, there were five apps that helped us manage big chunks of the wedding that I was not expecting when I proposed back in 2020.

Notes

iOS 15 Wedding Notes

(Image credit: TechRadar)

Apple's Notes app is one I've relied on since the first version of iOS. It's simple, useful, and has always helped remind me of what's needed to be done for certain tasks.

For the wedding, its usefulness went to another level, thanks in part to the ability to manage notes with someone.

Having both of us add and remove checklists across the two years helped a bunch, especially when an update can appear as a push notification.

Things 3

Things 3 Wedding list on iOS 15

(Image credit: TechRadar)

While we had been arranging the wedding since 2020, tasks didn't really ramp up until the beginning of this year, which is where a to-do app came in.

Having tried other apps in this category, such as OmniFocus, Things 3 won out thanks to the quick actions of its Today screen. I could add and remove sudden jobs, and they'd also display in a helpful widget on my iPhone.

It's not just available on your iPhone for $ 9.99 / £9.99 / AU$ 11.99, it's also available on the iPad for $ 19.99 / £19.99 / AU$ 24.99, and on the Mac priced at $ 49.99 / £29.99 / AU$ 59.99.

Being reminded to pay for a photo booth or to decide on types of flowers in Things was a big help. In fact, it was so helpful I've expanded it to other aspects of my life, including my job at TechRadar, and hobbies like, embarrassingly, weekly Fortnite challenges.

Shazam

iOS 15 Shazam Playlist

(Image credit: TechRadar)

Spotify and Apple Music are two apps I've constantly used for the last decade. I still pay for iTunes Match, which is a yearly service that allows me to host all the music content that I owned on my iPod.

For the wedding itself, we found Spotify useful in arranging the entire playlist from start to finish, mainly due to the ability to have collaborative playlists.

This allowed us to add and remove songs in a playlist as we pleased, with our initials letting each of us know who added the most embarrassing song of the evening.

However, Shazam was most useful in helping us discover artists and tracks that we never would have considered. Going to wedding fayres and shops we heard a lot of music and by using Shazam to discover what the titles were, we could add them to our Spotify and Apple Music playlists.

It's a handy app that can help bolster your music library on whichever music app you use, without being intrusive.

A recent update also allows Shazam to be set up as a shortcut in Control Center on iOS 15, which saves you time before the track stops playing.

Angry Birds

Angry Birds Classic on iOS 15

(Image credit: TechRadar)

For me, managing a wedding is the equivalent of spinning 50 plates while standing on one leg, and reciting the alphabet backward in Spanish.

And that can lead to moments where you just want to escape the planning and the picking, and the paying, and just play a game instead.

This is where I decided to revisit some games thanks to Apple Arcade, and I rediscovered Angry Birds. It was an ideal pick for alleviating some of the frustration that occurred with some suits in February.

The game's maker, Rovio has also re-released the original game on iOS and Android, which I promptly downloaded. Flicking the irate fowl across four worlds on my iPhone 13 Pro turned out to be a great stress reliever while I was on a train to sort out the suits again or deciding on the right type of chairs for the reception.

Monzo Pots

iOS 15 Monzo Pots

(Image credit: TechRadar)

Weddings cost money – lots of money. If you want to make sure that the location or items you had your heart set on for years can be part of your special day, you're going to hear the word deposit a lot until the big day arrives.

It's also a great lesson in managing your funds, which is where a feature from Monzo came in handy for us. Pots are a way of moving money into sections that can't be used by your debit card. They're essentially saving methods without creating a savings account.

You can lock a pot to stop you from withdrawing any money from it, alongside naming it whatever you wish and setting it with a picture. If you want, you can set any transactions to round up the payment to the nearest unit, with the spare change being sent to this pot.

It removes a worry about how much you have ready for the wedding or other saving goals, alongside making sure it's safe from temptation.

TechRadar – All the latest technology news

Read More

The best e-reader apps for use with iOS 15 in 2022

Your iPhone may be the computer you use the most, whether that’s for work, play, or relaxing with a movie. But what about for enjoying written content? That’s where the best ereader apps come in.

Whether it’s a comic book bursting with color, the latest non-fiction from your Amazon library, or a page-turner recommended by a friend, it has never been easier to enjoy a book via your phone. With iPhones growing in size, and including beautiful OLED displays across the iPhone 13 series, your content comes to life like never before.

With that in mind, here are our picks for the best ereader apps you’ll find on iOS. And since a tablet will likely be even better for most, all of the apps listed here have iPadOS versions, too.

Kindle

Kindle on iOS

(Image credit: TechRadar)

Kindle is synonymous with reading digital books, with Amazon offering its own series of devices for doing just that. That association may have buried the lede for some iPhone users, who may not actually have spotted that there’s a Kindle app on the App Store. And the good news is that it’s great.

The app offers more than a million books, and if you’re already an Amazon user who's picked up books before, your entire library will be ready to go from the off. Prime and Kindle Unlimited users can also grab free books as well as those included in their membership, alongside Audible functionality so you can listen to your books.

You’ll find nifty features such as instant Wikipedia lookup and translations, a built-in dictionary, and your progress will even sync to other devices.

Scribd

Scribd on iOS

(Image credit: TechRadar)

Not sure what you fancy reading, or not keen on splashing out on a book you may not like? Scribd has long been the “Netflix for books”, a subscription service that offers unlimited ebooks for $ 8.99/£10.99. 

And that's not all. Scribd also delivers access to audiobooks, magazines, and even sheet music. Sticking with written content, though, the app will sync across your iPhone, iPad, and even your Apple Watch, letting you pick up your content wherever you are. In addition, the reader itself is impressively customizable. You can set horizontal or vertical scroll, font size, and annotate pages without worrying about sticky notes.

Finally, Scribd is ad-free, which means more room on-screen for your content, library, and the chance to discover your next favorite book.

ComiXology

ComiXology iOS

(Image credit: TechRadar)

An early darling of the iPad’s app store, ComiXology is another entry on this list for Amazon – and yes, you’ll need an Amazon login to be able to read. That’s a shame, but it does come with the benefit of free issues on a regular basis.

If you’re a comic reader, it’s hard to beat ComiXology, which features Marvel, DC and plenty more – whether you’re a fan of superheroes, manga, or anything else. The digital comics pop right off the screen on the latest iPhones, delivering a feel of real immersion with Guided View. 

This clever mode moves from panel to panel, meaning you can spend less time thumbing at your screen and more time reading the adventures of the Justice League or Avengers.

Apple Books

iBooks in iOS 15

(Image credit: TechRadar)

No longer known as iBooks, and no longer offering that skeuomorphic bookshelf design, Apple’s own book store is well worth a look, and it’s already on your device by default.

As you can imagine, the library is stocked with all of the latest and greatest, alongside the classics, plus audiobooks are high-quality – and CarPlay compatible. You can also add your own documents, so if you have a hefty PDF to work through then you can do so with Apple’s gorgeous and minimal UI.

There are reading goals, too, and all of your progress syncs across your Apple devices, including the Mac.

Wattpad

Wattpad on iOS

(Image credit: TechRadar)

If you’re not looking for the kind of article you’d find in your local bookstore, and are instead more interested in finding the next Dickens or Brontë, then perhaps Wattpad is for you.

Wattpad collects the best original stories from budding authors and makes them discoverable, with a wealth of free content to read. You can even upload your own budding bestseller for others to enjoy.

However, it's worth noting that you’ll need a premium membership to sync progress between devices, which will set you back $ 5.99/£5.99.

Kobo Books

Kobo on iOS

(Image credit: TechRadar)

Part ereader, part social network for reading fans, Kobo Books offers an excellent reading experience with a twist.

You can read, highlight, annotate and more; but it really comes into its own with the “Reading Life” feature, which will let you build a community. Think of it as a book club within your app, with millions of books to read and audiobooks to listen to, combined with people to discuss them with.

There are also a huge number of free titles, so it’s worth hopping on to see if anything piques your interest.

Libby, by OverDrive

Libby on iOS

(Image credit: TechRadar)

If you’re looking for a more authentic library experience, Libby has you covered – not only can you read your own content, but you can borrow books for a period instead of buying them outright.

You can even annotate and make notes on your borrowed books, all without the fear of incurring a heavy fee for defacing them. Progress syncs across devices, but you will need to use a library card to log in (yes, really), and content is restricted to what your visited library has to offer.

Still, there’s something strangely quirky about Libby’s approach that makes us miss the library.

Blinkist

Blinkist on iOS

(Image credit: TechRadar)

For our final entry on this list, we opted for something a little unique – an ereader app that tries to stop you from reading a book in its entirety.

Okay, bear with us here. Blinkist’s neuroscientific research suggests you can absorb much of what a book has to offer in around 15 minutes. To that end, the app provides summations of books, either through text or via audiobooks. If that sounds like cheating then this may not be for you. However, if you have limited time or want to brush up on a conversation piece, it could be worth a look.

Still, this unique approach does mean that Blinkist has a smaller library than most of the alternatives here.

TechRadar – All the latest technology news

Read More

Best apps for Ramadan

Ramadan is a great time to get in touch with your spiritual sense, and thanks to modern technology and a smartphone, there are plenty of apps to help you during this holy month. 

We have selected five apps that are available for both iPhone and Android phones that help with everything from prayer times to Quran and Duaas recitals to help you on your Ramadan journey.

Pillars: Prayer Times & Qibla

Pillars App

(Image credit: Pillars)

Pillars is a beautifully designed ad-free app that focuses on prayer times as well as allowing you to track your prayers. It has a built-in Qibla finder and makes sure your data stays private by not leaving your device.

Download it here

Daily Supplications

Daily Supplication App

(Image credit: YoubO Apps)

Daily Supplications enables you to read and listen to more than 300 different Islamic Duaas and Hadiths. Using this app, you can recite multiple Duaas everyday in Ramadan with counters to help you keep track of what you've read

Check it out here

Quranic: Quran Arabic Learning

Quranic App

(Image credit: BusyPeople LLC)

If you’ve ever felt as though learning Quranic Arabic was too hard with lectures and traditional lessons, look no further. Quranic is designed to make learning Quranic words and the Arabic language engaging and interactive.

Check it out here

Miraj Islamic Stories & Games

Miraj App

(Image credit: Miraj Studios Ltd)

The Miraj Stories app is a vibrant multi-media library of audiobooks, animations, interactive stories and games for children aged 4 to 9. Crafted to develop skills such as listening, creativity and memory, Miraj stories are approved by scholars and educators.

Check it out here

Daily Muslim

Daily Muslim App

(Image credit: The Meaning of Islam)

The Daily Muslim app will slowly move you towards increasing your daily practices in a way that you will easily be able to fit in into your routine. Other than offering prayer times, Duas and a Qibla compass, this all-in-one app also has a Zakat calculator

Check it out here

TechRadar – All the latest technology news

Read More

Best apps for Ramadan

Ramadan is a great time to get in touch with your spiritual sense, and thanks to modern technology and a smartphone, there are plenty of apps to help you during this holy month. 

We have selected five apps that are available for both iPhone and Android phones that help with everything from prayer times to Quran and Duaas recitals to help you on your Ramadan journey.

Pillars: Prayer Times & Qibla

Pillars App

(Image credit: Pillars)

Pillars is a beautifully designed ad-free app that focuses on prayer times as well as allowing you to track your prayers. It has a built-in Qibla finder and makes sure your data stays private by not leaving your device.

Download it here

Daily Supplications

Daily Supplication App

(Image credit: YoubO Apps)

Daily Supplications enables you to read and listen to more than 300 different Islamic Duaas and Hadiths. Using this app, you can recite multiple Duaas everyday in Ramadan with counters to help you keep track of what you've read

Check it out here

Quranic: Quran Arabic Learning

Quranic App

(Image credit: BusyPeople LLC)

If you’ve ever felt as though learning Quranic Arabic was too hard with lectures and traditional lessons, look no further. Quranic is designed to make learning Quranic words and the Arabic language engaging and interactive.

Check it out here

Miraj Islamic Stories & Games

Miraj App

(Image credit: Miraj Studios Ltd)

The Miraj Stories app is a vibrant multi-media library of audiobooks, animations, interactive stories and games for children aged 4 to 9. Crafted to develop skills such as listening, creativity and memory, Miraj stories are approved by scholars and educators.

Check it out here

Daily Muslim

Daily Muslim App

(Image credit: The Meaning of Islam)

The Daily Muslim app will slowly move you towards increasing your daily practices in a way that you will easily be able to fit in into your routine. Other than offering prayer times, Duas and a Qibla compass, this all-in-one app also has a Zakat calculator

Check it out here

TechRadar – All the latest technology news

Read More

The best alternative email apps for iOS 15 in 2022

It’d be fair to say that much of the world runs on email, making it a must to have the best iOS email app for you.

While tools like Slack, WhatsApp and Discord all exist for instant messaging, email remains the way many people communicate. Whether it’s sending projects for approval, connecting with a loved one, or simply sharing notes for the latest office meeting, there’s plenty of life in email yet.

While your iPhone comes with Apple Mail installed, it’s not for everyone. Apple continues to improve it, but it can be a little clunky to use and lacks many of the more nuanced features of other email apps. iI’s also not much to look at. For basic sending and receiving messages, it’s great, but if you deal with a lot of emails, you may be looking for something flashier.

Thankfully, we’ve got you covered with the best alternative email apps for iOS, all of which make smart changes to the basic formula.

Microsoft Outlook

Outlook iOS app

(Image credit: TechRadar)

It’s perhaps strange to trumpet Outlook as one of the best email apps for the iPhone, but it really is an excellent choice.

Microsoft’s long-running email client looks better here than it ever has before, and it’s plenty powerful too. Its Smart Inbox works out which emails are important and snoozes the others for later. You can also swipe emails to perform quick actions (something that many other apps on this list do).

Perhaps our favorite aspect though is that the calendar within Outlook is so good you can use it as your main planner. Its inclusion means that all your meetings and events, whether they’re from Google Calendar, iCloud, or elsewhere, are in one place.

Hey

Hey iOS Mail app

(Image credit: TechRadar)

Hey has been the subject of much discussion, both in terms of its pricing, feature set, and the fact that the developer and Apple had a falling out over in-app payments.

Nonetheless, Hey is an excellent email client if you can stomach the $ 99 annual fee. Hey users get all kinds of great features, like the ability to screen emails from new senders, and unique filtering rules like the Paper Trail (for receipts) or The Feed (for newsletters).

To use Hey, you’ll have to direct all your existing email to it, but doing so will let you pick a custom @hey.com address.

Spark

Spark iOS mail app

(Image credit: TechRadar)

Of all of the apps on this list, Spark feels the fastest to use, and it’s got a great visual style with plenty of color in icons but mostly plain everywhere else.

Available on the App Store for free, there are plenty of features here that should give Apple something to ponder for an updated version of Mail.

As with others on this list, there’s a Smart inbox, but we’re particularly fond of Spark's array of 'actions' – you can snooze a thread, remind yourself to follow up later, create Smart Notifications, and more. There’s also a nice slide-over calendar, too.

Spark also plays nicely with attachments, letting you download and open files within the app itself rather than dipping into another option. Attachment search is great, too, and you can attach whatever you’re sending to cloud services straight from the app.

Edison

Edison iOS Mail app

(Image credit: TechRadar)

Edison is another good-looking Apple Mail alternative, but its real superpower is its built-in assistant.

Edison’s assistant will filter your emails by type or sender, and it’s perfect for those with butterfingers since it’ll let you undo the sending of an email up to fifteen seconds after you hit the Send button. There are also the slide-to-action options seen elsewhere on this list, too.

Edison leans a little on Hey’s business model, now that it works with OnMail. You can use Edison for free, but paying $ 4.99 will get you a custom domain, password-protected large file links, and an increased attachment size up to 250MB.

Twobird

Twobird iOS Mail app

(Image credit: TechRadar)

The new kid on the mail-block, Twobird is part email app and part to-do list – and it’s great at both.

The email experience removes as much from around the actual content of your email as it can, cleaning up the experience to let you focus on the who and the what. You’ll also be able to turn the emails in your inbox into a task list of sorts, tying it in with your other daily reminders, while smart notifications work out what you need to know and when.

Twobird is off to a great start, but there’s a big caveat – there’s no option to currently add your iCloud here, sadly. Gmail and Exchange users, however, will find a lot to love.

AirMail

AirMail iOS app

(Image credit: TechRadar)

Airmail has a smart-looking design that feels ripped straight from Apple’s own design language. In fact, it feels like Apple Mail, but better.

The real strength of Airmail is in its integrations with other services – be those web services or other apps on your phone. If you use it, chances are, Airmail can too; Google Drive, Todoist, Drafts, Trello, they’re all here. It’s a far cry from Apple’s more siloed experience.

While Airmail is free, you can upgrade to a Pro plan for $ 2.99 per month (or $ 9.99 per year). Doing so gets you a unified inbox, multiple themes, and the option to snooze and delay sending.

Spike

Spike iOS Mail app

(Image credit: TechRadar)

Spike shakes things up by attempting to blur the lines between email and instant messaging. It looks closer to iMessage than it does to Apple Mail, which may put some people off.

In truth, it’s closer to something like Slack, stripping away the need for long emails full of headers and signatures and boiling it down to the message content and any attachments. It’s configurable for teams, too, so you can send an email to a group of colleagues as if it were a Slack message.

There are built-in notes and task management options, too, with both working collaboratively. And just like others on this list, there’s a Priority Inbox so you never miss an important email.

TechRadar – All the latest technology news

Read More