macOS 13 release date rumors, compatible Macs, and 5 features we want to see

After the release of macOS 12 Monterey in 2021, followed by the MacBook Pro 14-inch and 16-inch models, speculation is now mounting as to what macOS 13 will bring.

Back in 2020, Apple began transitioning away from Intel processors in favor of its own Apple Silicon chips. These chips are now redefining what Macs are capable of, particularly when it comes to gaming. While macOS Monterey focused on productivity and communication tweaks, macOS 13 could be a major update of the type not seen since macOS 11 Big Sur, reflecting this new change in direction.

With this in mind, we’ve combed through our Macs to round up five features we’d like to see later this year, no matter how major or minor these may be.

First, though, we’ll run through what we know about macOS 13 so far, including its rumored release date and which Macs the update is likely to support.

macOS 13 release date rumors

Apple’s releases have run like clockwork in recent years. There’s a good chance macOS 13 will be announced at WWDC 2022 alongside iOS 16, iPadOS 16, and the rest. Whether it’ll be a remote keynote again or a return to an in-person event remains to be confirmed by Apple.

Apple usually announces the release date of a new macOS update alongside new Macs, so this could be October again, similar to the previous two years.

macOS 13 supported devices

With Apple well on the way to leaving Intel behind, it’s a matter of time until macOS runs solely on the company’s own M1 chips and above.

macOS 13 is likely to still support Intel Macs for now, though. We expect that the upcoming update will support the following Macs as a minimum:

  • Mac Pro – Late 2013
  • iMac – Early 2015
  • iMac Pro – Late 2017
  • MacBook Air – Early 2015
  • MacBook Pro – Early 2015
  • MacBook – Early 2015

macOS 13 name rumors

We speculated that macOS 12 would be called either Mammoth or Monterey, and it proved to be the latter at WWDC 2021. Mammoth could be another solid bet for macOS 13, though. 

The name refers to the Mammoth Lakes in California, following the pattern of naming releases after landmarks in the state, and it’s close to Monterey and Big Sur, which may also represent a bigger update to macOS compared to the last year.

Five features we want to see in macOS 13

While macOS 13 is still a little while away, we've put together a list of the improvements we want to see from the next-gen operating system for Apple's Macs.

1. Widgets anywhere

Widgets first appeared in iOS 14 back in 2020, and have slowly moved over to iPadOS, where you can also move them anywhere on the home screen, but in macOS they are still locked to a column.

macOS 13 should allow you to move widgets anywhere on the screen. Some forget that widgets first appeared on macOS way back in 2004 with Dashboard in Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger, as a way of managing them inside one app that would cover your screen.

Having Dashboard return to macOS 13 or the ability to place widgets anywhere on your desktop would be appealing. It would help spruce up your display, and eliminate the need to go to the column to view them.

2. Weather app

The weather app saw a mammoth redesign in iOS 15 last year, mainly thanks to Apple’s acquisition of the weather app Dark Sky. While the app hasn’t moved to iPadOS just yet, the next logical step would be to macOS.

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Having easy access to weather forecasts, plus precipitation and storm notifications could be useful to many Mac users – especially if widgets can be shown on the desktop instead of the column they’re currently locked to.

3. App Library

App Library is another iOS feature that would be useful to have in the Dock for macOS 13. While Launchpad and Finder give you handy overviews of your installed apps and let you add them to folders, they’re the only view that you have.

That can be tricky if you have hundreds of apps, especially as a full-screen view in Launchpad can get in the way of anything you’re working on.

App Library in iPadOS 15

(Image credit: Apple)

App Library on the Mac could easily sort your apps into categories, and have some folders change depending on the time of day or your location, just as it does in iOS. It would be much more useful for Mac users, as having a full-screen view on an iMac or an external display seems too much.

4. Time Machine and iCloud Backups

Time Machine is a feature that’s fallen by the wayside in recent years, regardless of how useful it’s proved in the past. It takes multiple snapshots of your macOS machine throughout the day, and if you lose a file, you can go ‘back in time’ and recover it.

Time Machine first appeared in Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard back in 2006, and while it’s still available in macOS, there’s plenty that could be improved for macOS 13.

It’s second nature to back up your iPad or iPhone through iCloud Backup, which lets you save photos, messages, lock screen wallpapers, and more to your iCloud account. You can also restore these backups to your device if you need to reset it.

However, there’s no such feature for macOS; there’s only the option of backing up to an external hard drive or directly on your Mac, which could defeat the point if your Mac refuses to boot.

Having iCloud Backups tied to Time Machine feels like an easy win for Mac users, as it’s secure but also familiar.

5. tvOS screensavers for Mac

We’d love to see Apple bring those impressive flyover screensavers from tvOS to macOS 13.

Aerial 3 on macOS

(Image credit: Aerial)

While there are third-party apps such as Aerial that can already do the job for Mac users, having a native option for macOS 13 would be great for anyone who just wants to use the screensavers in the System Preferences, without having to download an additional app.

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Android 13 release date rumors, supported phones and what we want to see

After the release of Android 12 in 2021, followed by the subsequent releases of the Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro, we’re already wondering what the next version of Android will bring.

Since its debut in 2008, Android has always brought a major feature with every headline release. But with Android 13, codenamed Tiramisu, it could be a perfect time for Google to fine-tune what’s already there in the millions of Android smartphones around the world.

We’ve combed through our Pixel, OnePlus, and other Android phones to roundup five features we’d like to see arrive in Android 13 later this year, no matter how major or minor these may be.

But first, we’ll run you through when we expect it to land and which Android phones will likely be supported.

Android 13 release date rumors

A new Android version usually appears for developers in February. This gives developers a heads up as to what should be appearing in the fall of that year, allowing them an idea of what they could implement for future versions of their apps.

A version for consumers is usually announced at Google I/O in June, followed by a public beta release, then a shipping release around October, which is when we expect Android 13 to arrive this year. 

Android 13 supported phones

Android has a reputation for not making it easy to update your phone to the latest version. Part of it is due to the different manufacturers on how they have designed Android to match a brand, such as Samsung.

But with Google releasing a new Pixel phone every year, these usually come with the latest Android version. It wouldn’t be a surprise to see a Pixel 7 or a Pixel Fold appear with Android 13 in October again to start with. 

Other manufacturers usually follow after a few months of testing and putting their own spin on the new Android release, but it’s usually not until the first half of the next year.

What we want to see

Android 13 is still a little while away, so we've put together a list of the improvements we want to see from the next-gen software.

1. UI Fixes

Google IO 2021

(Image credit: Google)

While Material You showcases a new look for Android, it’s not without its faults. Some buttons are confusing users when a feature is enabled. For example, if you go to ‘Internet’ in the Notification Center, you have to press this icon again to toggle Mobile Data, Wi-Fi, and Hotspot. It feels convoluted, and there's no option to make these three options a separate toggle.

Alongside this, the colors in Android 12 lack contrast – everything looks pale compared to the vibrancy that iOS shows. But according to Android Police, it looks like Google is already aware of this, as new vibrant colors have seemingly leaked for Android 13.

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Giving some saturated colors across the user interface could help the overall appearance of Android. However, the Material You design we're currently seeing is essentially version 1.0 of a new look for the operating system. iOS is still seeing refinements in its flat design since 2013, so we're going to see visual improvements in Android for years to come.

2. Scrolling Screenshots for all, not some apps

Android 12 UI from Google I/O 2021

(Image credit: Google)

This feature was introduced for some apps in Android 12, where you could take a screenshot of a web page, but Android would stitch the content into one image. 

However, while it’s a useful feature, it requires developers to include a ‘View-based UI’ in the app, otherwise scrolling screenshots isn’t an option for users.

Instead, Android 13 should make this available to all apps, regardless of the current requirement. Users shouldn’t need to check whether certain features in Android are also available to certain apps, and scrolling screenshots is one of them.

3. Release the backtap gesture

A Pixel 6 in Kinda Coral, held by someone wearing a red dress

(Image credit: Google)

This first appeared in a beta version of Android 11 back in 2020, before it was removed when the final release appeared for the Pixel 4 series and other smartphones.

There’s a variant already available on Apple’s iOS 15, where you can customize a back-tap gesture on your iPhone, that could launch the Camera app or a shortcut for example.

It’s very useful for when you’re browsing another app, and you quickly want to switch to the camera app without going back to the home screen and finding its icon.

For Android, the backtap could be an easy win for users, especially as the software can be better customized compared to iOS. Imagine an Android 13 backtap where you can launch certain apps or media with a certain amount of taps, or the end result changes, depending on the app that you’re currently using.

4. Hand Off from iOS

Google Nest Mini

(Image credit: Future)

According to Android Police, this may already be coming to Android 13, mirroring a feature where you can transfer what you’re listening to on your iPhone, to a HomePod speaker for example.

Tentatively called ‘TTT’ or Tap to Transfer, you can send the media you’re either watching or listening to, towards a device that could be in your home or workplace.

With a barrage of televisions running Android, alongside smart speakers, this could work well for sending across media in an easier way from your smartphone.

5. Please fix ‘Open by Default’ feature

Setting a different clock app on Android

(Image credit: Google)

Before Android 12, you could open a file and a message box would appear, asking you if you’d like to open this in an app just once, or from then on.

It was a simple message box but it solved a purpose. But with Android 12, an ‘Open with Default’ appears instead, ridding you of the choice of using an app once.

This change has been frustrating to users, as it requires you to go deep into the Settings app to make the filetype forget to open in a certain app. For Android 13, let’s revert it back to how it was. That’s all we ask.

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Windows 11 22H1 Update ‘Sun Valley 2’ release date rumors, news, and features

Microsoft is currently working on the next big update to Windows 11, tentatively called Sun Valley 2.

This is already shaping up to be a collection of small and big refinements across the whole operating system of Windows 11, alongside some new features, such as Android apps appearing on the Microsoft Store.

Microsoft is yet to officially reveal the 22H1 update to Windows 11, but through leaks, rumors, and the Windows Insider Program, we’ll begin to piece together a good picture throughout the months leading up to its release.

With Windows 11 still rolling out to more devices, users are curious as to what the 22H1 update will now bring.

As we begin to build a picture of what to expect, here is everything we know so far about the first major update for Windows 11.

Cut to the chase

  • What is it? Windows 11 22H1 ‘Sun Valley 2′ is the first major update to Windows 11
  • When is it out? Windows 11 22H1 ‘Sun Valley 2′ is expected sometime in the second quarter of 2022
  • How much does it cost? Windows 11 22H1 ‘Sun Valley 2′ will be a free update for all users 

Windows 11 22H1 ‘Sun Valley 2' release date 

Right now there is no confirmed release date for the Windows 11 22H1 ‘Sun Valley 2' update. Microsoft’s release schedule for Windows 11 updates is now once a year, compared to two a year with Windows 10 previously.

There have already been plenty of improvements in the Windows Insider channels, which allows users to test features in development. But it looks like Microsoft is rolling all of these into the first major update of Windows 11.

While the operating system was released in November 2021, it was announced in June, which would be a good time to release Sun Valley 2 with some tentpole features.

Windows 11 22H1 ‘Sun Valley 2' speculation

At this time there is no confirmed name from Microsoft. Based on the naming convention for Windows 11 updates, however, it’s safe to assume that its official designation will be Windows 11 22H1. The ‘22’ refers to the year and ‘H1’ refers to the second half of the year.

The name being discussed at the moment for this moment is ‘Sun Valley 2’, which is unlikely to be its release name. This is an internal codename for parts of the next version of Windows 11 which is being worked on and has been outed to the public by way of leaks from those with insider knowledge of Microsoft’s workings. 

As Windows 11 was a significant upgrade from Windows 10, such as a refreshed look, a redesigned Microsoft Store, and the return of widgets, Sun Valley 2 looks to build upon Windows 11 but also improve certain aspects that users have been sending feedback over.

Updated Notepad in Windows 11

(Image credit: Microsoft)

In the Insider builds, users have spotted more apps gaining the new Fluent Design, which is the overall look for Windows 11. These apps feature rounded corners, lesser reliance on the Ribbon view that's been across the operating system since Windows 8, and a more vibrant color scheme. There have also been features announced last year that have yet to come to every Windows 11 user.

Android apps coming to Windows 11

Testers in the Beta Channel who have Windows 11 Build 22000.xxx and above will be able to try out Android apps that will show as available in the Microsoft Store.

These will originate from Amazon's App Store instead of Google Play, as every app is tested and approved by Amazon, similar to Apple's effort with the App Store.

These will run similar to how iOS apps run on macOS, with apps such as TikTok and Instagram running in a window.

However, there's already other ways to install Android apps directly, without going through the Microsoft Store.

New OS features for Windows 11 22H1 ‘Sun Valley 2'

This first update to Windows 11 looks to be built on feedback from users, alongside more refinements that Microsoft didn't have time to include in the first release in November.

One feature that's been divided by users has been the taskbar. The start menu has seen a redesign in Windows 11, but while the new look has been a positive, some features that were present in Windows 10, cannot be found here.

In Sun Valley 2, the taskbar looks to be bringing back some features and listening to some feedback, with drag and drop coming back to the taskbar.

Other OS improvements are more apps from Microsoft that will be refreshed with the Fluent Design language that's across Windows 11. Notepad is one of the examples for Sun Valley 2, gaining dark mode and a re-arranged menu bar.

While Paint is another app to gain from a refreshed look, Microsoft surprised many at the end of 2021 by bringing back Windows Media Player.

It will be replacing Groove Music, an app that debuted back in Windows 8 in 2012. This will be available in the Microsoft Store, but will be scheduled to appear as the default app to play media files once Sun Valley 2 is available to everyone.

Windows 11 updates look to already be about more than visual flair, and Sun Valley 2 is set to be no exception. There will be several changes underneath that aren’t user-facing, as always, and a number that will be.

But from what Microsoft is working on and showcasing through the Insider program, it's clear that the company wants to update the apps of Windows 11, not just the front-facing features.

Windows Media Player on Windows 11

(Image credit: Microsoft)

How to test the Windows 11 22H1 Update before launch

Before Microsoft pushes out any big update to Windows 11, it passes through the various channels in the Windows Insider Program. There are various channels in the Insider Program which relate to how far ahead of time you’ll be able to test new features, with the most cutting edge being the ‘Dev Channel’, targeted at the most technical users.

The ‘Dev Channel’ was the first place that Sun Valley started to appear, with a 2200 build number appearing in November 2021. Other app updates to Paint and Windows Media Player soon appeared in the 'Beta Channel'.

These will be reliable builds tied to a future release with updates validated by Microsoft. Closer to launch, Windows 11 22H1 will hit the ‘Release Preview Channel’ which is the most stable of all in the Insider Program. Builds released to this channel are supported by Microsoft.

If you’re not yet in the Windows Insider Program and you’d like to start testing future updates early you can enroll right from the Settings app on your PC. Head to the ‘Update & Security section, then select ‘Windows Insider Program’ and choose the channel you want to join. You will then begin receiving updates through ‘Windows Update’ on your PC corresponding to the channel you joined.

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iOS 16 release date rumors, supported iPhones and 5 features we want to see

After seeing the releases of iOS 15 and the subsequent iPhone 13 series, we’re in the midst of .1 updates that are slowly refining features we’ve been seeing since June, back at WWDC.

However, that doesn’t stop us from thinking of what could be in the next version of iOS that is widely expected to be called iOS 16.

Every iOS release has brought a major feature to the table, whether that’s widgets or dark mode. But iOS could still benefit from some new refinements to better manage how you use your iPhone every day.

We’ve combed through our iPhones to roundup five features we’d like to see arrive in iOS 16 next year, no matter how major or minor these may be. But first, we’ll run you through when we expect it to land and which iPhones will be supported.

iOS 16 release date rumors

Apple has followed a traditional schedule of announcing the latest iOS update in June at WWDC, followed by a release around September.

With iOS 15.2 currently in testing, Apple has been focusing on rolling out significant features across more .1 updates. In previous years, we've seen the trackpad appear on iOS 13.4, alongside ProRes in iOS 15.1 in October of this year.

It wouldn't be a stretch to expect an iOS 15.7 by the time we see iOS 16 with more significant features.

iOS 16 supported iPhones

Apple tries to support a variety of iPhone models in every new iOS release. iOS 15 supports iPhone 6S at a minimum, which was released in 2015.

It wouldn't be a stretch to expect iOS 16 to support the iPhone 7 series at a minimum, but with some features held back, mainly due to the hardware limitations of the camera, or the chip inside certain iPhone models.

Every iOS release comes with a major feature, but also a bunch of minor improvements across the board. If you still have an iPhone 8 for instance, you may reap the benefits of some of the small features in iOS 16 when it arrives. But you will most likely miss out on the big feature that Apple will showcase.

Redesigned Camera app

iPhone 13 Pro

(Image credit: TechRadar)

The iPhone camera has seen huge improvements in recent years, with more lenses being added and features such as Night Mode and Cinematic Mode being introduced.

However, this has meant that the camera app has begun to feel bloated. Accessing forced flash or exposure settings requires a few more swipes than we’d like, alongside hidden gestures that don’t feel needed.

With the impending release of iOS 15.2, we’re also about to see a new macro button appear, which will help you to more accurately set up those close-up shots when needed. This is just for the iPhone 13 series, though.

Starting afresh with the camera app could help new users take photos in a whole new way, alongside giving existing users a fresh way of taking photos and videos.

It wouldn’t be a stretch to assume that Apple has more big plans for the cameras in future iPhone models, which will also mean new features that we’ll be switching on and off when required. Let’s see an app that’s redesigned for what came before, and lays the groundwork for what’s coming next.

QuickNote to iPhone

macOS Monterey Notes and Quick Note

(Image credit: Apple)

This is a feature that appears in iPadOS 15 and macOS 12 Monterey, where you can drag your finger from the bottom-right corner, and you can quickly type in some notes, no matter where you are on your device.

There are many gestures you can do on an iPhone, so there’s no harm in adding one more. Dragging from the bottom right corner would display a note that you could quickly type in, and save for a later date.

With your thumb being your primary point of interaction with your smartphone, it's an easy win that can really help with quickly jotting something down. It will also save the strain of your thumb instead of reaching for the Control Center on the top right, and selecting the Notes icon.

Home Automation widgets

Using the Home app on an iPhone 13 Pro in iOS 15

(Image credit: Apple)

Since widgets were given a makeover in iOS 14, alongside the ability to place them anywhere on the home screen, some other apps have not been forthcoming with their own widgets to help reduce some steps. One blatant example is the Home app.

You may have a selection of smart lights in your home where you use the app to help manage these. But if you want to quickly switch on a light, you may experience a delay if you ask Siri, or if the app isn’t responding, which has happened often in our experience.

Having a widget on your home screen for your smart lights could really help reduce the steps in quickly switching the bedroom lamp on, instead of having to find the Home app.

It’s a little strange that the widget hasn’t appeared as yet, but we’re hoping it arrives, not only to iOS 16, but future versions of macOS and iPadOS as well.

Air apps

Apple AirPods Pro

(Image credit: Apple )

If you own one of the AirPods peripherals, or an AirTag, you may find it very cumbersome to try and manage each of these. AirPods settings are only accessible through Bluetooth from within the Settings app, while AirTags settings are accessible through the Find My app.

Being able to manage these through a centralized ‘AirThings’ app could relieve a lot of confusion as to what you own from Apple.

Third-party vendors such as Sony bring out certain apps that can help you manage headphones and more to better manage the features that these bring. Being able to do the same, without having to go to Bluetooth within the Settings app, could bring a lot of simplicity to managing your devices.

Better theme options

Three iPhones running iOS 15

(Image credit: Apple)

Back in 2019, we saw an onslaught of themes thanks to a few new features that the Shortcuts app provided in iOS 13.

With Shortcuts, you can use the app to create launch commands for other apps, and place an icon of your choice on the home screen for it. This has resulted in many themes being made available for iPhone users.

YouTuber Marques Brownlee created a short guide to create your own icons with Shortcuts.

But iOS 16 could go further. A new category in the App Store could enable themes to be downloaded and then selected within the Settings app. You could also choose different colors and sounds for notifications and set them as a separate theme, which could also be enabled with Automations in the Shortcuts app.

Third-party developers could perhaps make their own sounds and themes available as well. While there would be restrictions on changing other app icons, it could further expand the individuality that users want from their devices.

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The latest Nintendo Switch Pro rumors are pretty disappointing

Whisperings of a new Nintendo Switch Pro have been gaining more traction in recent months as more and more leaks begin to appear online. While some have potentially been too good to be true, like that Switch Pro production will start in the next few months, we're hoping the most recent rumor isn't true.

On Korean site Clién's community forums (via Wccftech), a poster named Cathedral Knight claims that the Switch Pro will launch in Q4 but will not boast 4K and upgraded performance as expected.

Instead of moving to an upgraded version of Tegrax1 +GPU, Nintendo will apparently work with Nvidia to create a custom processor based on Volta. In other words, not much will actually improve with the Switch Pro, it may just be a little faster.

Let's hope not

Now, let us remind you that this is a rumor and the poster goes on to claim that this custom processor currently isn't ready for mass production – contradicting the previous rumor we heard about the Switch Pro going into mass production in coming months.

Plus a Q4 release would put Nintendo in direct competition with the PS5 and Xbox Series X, a move Nintendo tends to avoid where possible.

While it's been claimed this poster is a reliable source of leaking information, we aren't so sure. We couldn't find any evidence suggesting this is the case, but that's not to say they're completely unreliable, just that – as with every rumor – we should treat it with a suitable amount of speculation. 

In addition, we can't imagine Nintendo releasing a Switch Pro that simply worked a little faster – we would be very disappointed if that was the case and so would a lot of fans. It also doesn't line up with previous rumors that this new Switch would be "premium".

We're hoping Nintendo sheds some light on the rumored Switch Pro in the coming months, but we also hope it boasts more hardware upgrades than this.

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