Windows 11’s Moment 5 update is imminent, but only a lucky few will get the best features

Windows 11’s next feature update, known as Moment 5, does indeed appear to be coming imminently – as was recently rumored – as a test build of the upgrade has just arrived in the Release Preview channel.

As you may be aware, that’s the final test channel before the release version of Windows 11 (as the name makes clear).

Preview build 22631 for Windows 11 23H2 (patch KB5034848) comes with a bunch of improvements, but not nearly the same quantity that’d normally be delivered by a Moment update – this is a relatively minor affair.

Build 22631 includes a shift for the Copilot button, which is moved to the right of the taskbar (into the system tray area, where the clock lives).

This preview also powers up the Snipping Tool so you can edit photos just taken on your Android smartphone on the desktop (for those who have their phone hooked up to Windows 11, of course).

There’s a raft of bug fixes here, too, plus other changes are coming courtesy of a separate February Windows Configuration Update (KB5035349) that’s being delivered at the same time. (Indeed, this will be installed simultaneously for some users – those who have the ‘get the latest updates’ toggle turned on).

The complementary KB5035349 includes a fair bit of work on a key accessibility feature, namely Voice Access, which is getting the ability to implement custom commands, and to open apps or interact with elements on the desktop. Also, those with multiple monitors can use Voice Access across all those displays, and it’s receiving bolstered support for additional languages too.

Elsewhere, there are small tweaks to improve the Nearby Share feature, and better transfer speeds when using it. Also, the Windows share panel now lets you share via WhatsApp (via the ‘Share using’ option).

Furthermore, the Snap Layouts feature now offers intelligent suggestions to give you quick and easy options for snapping windows together. That’ll be pretty handy for folks who use that part of the Windows 11 interface.


Unhappy laptop user

(Image credit: Marjan Apostolovic / Shutterstock)

Analysis: Bigger changes are inbound, but not for most folks

There’s nothing that major here, then, and some previously rumored abilities (like being able to undock Copilot) don’t seem to have made the cut.

There are other big changes incorporated with Moment 5, but the catch is that they aren’t coming to US users – or other regions for that matter, they’re only being provided to those in Europe.

Specifically, Windows 11 users in the European Economic Area (EEA) will be treated to an extensive set of changes to some core features, all of which relate to complying with incoming regulations in the region (namely the Digital Markets Act).

That includes the ability to completely remove the Edge browser from Windows 11, and also to ditch Bing from the operating system’s search box in the taskbar. Options users in the US, and elsewhere, would like to benefit from in some cases, no doubt – but sadly, they won’t get the chance.

This represents the final testing phase of the Moment 5 update, and it fits with the previously rumored release timeframe (for the finished version) of late in February.

The caveat, mind you, is that this end-of-February update will be the optional release (still officially in preview), with the full rollout not starting until March (in the cumulative update for that month). As ever, this will be a phased rollout too, as Microsoft will be monitoring for problems that could crop up even with release software.

The big update for this year – for everyone around the globe – is, of course, Windows 11 24H2, which has now been confirmed by Microsoft (meaning it won’t be Windows 12, as some rumors previously suggested).

Via Neowin

You might also like…

TechRadar – All the latest technology news

Read More

Colleges are now teaching courses on how to use ChatGPT effectively – and it may be the only way forward

ChatGPT has created quite a buzz since its launch last fall, and has quickly settled as a staple in everyday life. Despite concerns surrounding the use of AI within academic fields, some university professors are now introducing classes and courses focused solely on educating students on the topics of prompt engineering and AI comprehension.

The rapid rise in popularity prompted Andrew Maynard, a professor at Arizona State University’s School for the Future of Innovation in Society, to offer a course tailored to help students get a head start with these emergent AI tools.

“We’ve got to the point where it was very clear to me [that] there was a lot of panic, a lot of intrigue and things were moving fast”, Maynard told Inside Higher Ed.

In April this year, Maynard offered a course now known as Basic Prompt Engineering with ChatGPT, which teaches students how to effectively create prompts for the chatbot that consistently generates desirable output.

Adapt to Survive?

While there has been significant pushback in the education sector against ChatGPT, citing obvious concerns like plagiarism and cheating, the faculty behind courses like Maynard’s see this as an opportunity to prepare students for the drastically changing digital landscape created by OpenAI’s ChatGPT and other AI tools like it.

This will affect every domain, every discipline, and it’s really important we teach it.

Jules White

Jules White, director of the Future of Learning and Generative AI at Vanderbilt University, argues that “People are saying, ‘Generative AI is taking your job’ – if that’s the case, we better do something about it and make sure students are innovating and succeeding”.

It may seem like a counterproductive approach to the concerns about how AI will affect future employment landscapes, but the move to get young members of the workforce up to speed and ‘useful’ in a world of increasing AI prevalence could actually mitigate any projected damage to the job market.

Amusingly enough, Maynard went straight to ChatGPT to help design his online course, though he did also have faculty and graduate students help test and evaluate the content. The chatbot did have a major role in the initial phases of creating the course; while it makes sense for ChatGPT to explain how to use its own software, could this be the start of AI-generated curriculums?

TechRadar – All the latest technology news

Read More

ChatGPT is adding Bing access on iPhone, but only if you pay up

ChatGPT’s iPhone app is going to offer users access to the internet via Bing – but only if you’re willing to pay for a premium ChatGPT subscription.

OpenAI’s large language models (LLM) that power its ChatGPT bot have taken the tech world by storm this year, with GPT 3 and now GPT 4 integration being introduced to a bevy of products including Spotify, Bing, and even Mercedes cars.

Some integrations go both ways too, with Bing being added to ChatGPT’s web version back in May. Now Bing has come to ChatGPT’s iPhone app for people who pay $ 20 a month for ChatGPT Plus (roughly £16 / AU$ 30).

This looks set to be a major upgrade for the iPhone app. One significant drawback to ChatGPT and the GPT 4 LLM is that it only has data that’s accurate up to around September 2021 – so if you ask the LLM questions about events that happened in 2022 or 2023 it probably won’t know what you’re talking about, and it may hallucinate (read: make something up). Giving GPT 4 access to Bing would enable the chatbot to find answers to questions that fall outside of its stored data. 

Don’t expect this Bing integration to be an instant enhancement to ChatGPT’s iPhone version mind. For one thing, the feature is only in beta, so it may have a few issues that OpenAI still needs to patch out. For another, while the internet is home to more recent data that could help boost the AI’s reliability, it’s also home to inaccurate info, so ChatGPT’s answers will likely still feature errors. 

How to use ChatGPT with Bing on iPhone 

To use ChatGPT’s new Bing powers on your iPhone you’ll need to sign up for ChatGPT Plus. You’ll then want to download the latest version of the iOS app (v1.2023.173).

Microsoft Bing logo on a white smartphone screen

(Image credit: Shutterstock / Primakov)

Once your update has been completed, make sure you’re signed in to the app and then tap the menu button (the three dots) at the top-right corner of the screen. Then tap Settings, then New Features. In this sub-menu you should see an option to enable Browsing; select GPT-4 as your model, and make sure to select 'Browse with Bing'.

For now, there’s no Android app for ChatGPT, though one is apparently coming soon. Microsoft has also said that Bing integration will be available to non-paying ChatGPT users, but for now, it’s only for Plus subscribers. If you want to enjoy an AI-powered Bing experience for free (and on Android or iOS), you’ll need to download the Bing app and use its Bing Chat feature.

TechRadar – All the latest technology news

Read More

You can now draw directly on a PDF – but only if you have an Android phone

Making specific amendments to a PDF file on your Android device could soon be a lot more hands-on thanks to a new update.

Google Drive has announced a new feature that will allow users to annotate or draw onto a PDF file when viewing a preview on their Android device with their finger or stylus.

The company says its new annotation tools will offer users of the cloud storage platform a quick and easy way to make edits whilst on the move, for example when travelling to a meeting or on their commute.

Android PDF edits

When updated, users will now see a new pen-shaped floating action button (FAB) in the bottom-right corner of the screen when opening a PDF file in Google Drive for Android, which when tapped, opens up a new toolbar of options to draw and annotate with.

The pen tool is available in red, black, blue, and green with multiple stroke thicknesses, ranging from 8 to 40px. These can be adjusted by dragging a slider with your finger or stylus. 

There is also a highlighter, which is available in yellow, green, blue, or purple, and an eraser, which is able to remove any strokes you may have made, alongside undo and redo capabilities. Finally, there is an option to hide all edits entirely. 

Your annotations can then be directly saved to the file if it is a PDF, or you can create a new PDF copy of the file with the annotations saved to it. And if you'd prefer a cleaner view, the toolbar can also be snapped to the side of the screen by tapping and holding.

The new function is rolling out now, with users downloading the latest version of Google Drive set to be the first to enjoy – although they will need to have Android 6.0 Marshmallow or above installed on their device.

The update is one of a series of recent upgrades to Google Drive, as the company looks to ensure its service remains useful and intuitive for users everywhere.

It recently added a new toolbar for multi-selecting files too, which Google hopes will make bulk changes easier to accomplish, alongside new “search chips”, which will find files fast by filtering for criteria such as file type, when a document was last modified, and who they have been shared with.

TechRadar – All the latest technology news

Read More

Apple explains what ‘Clean Charging’ is for iOS 16.1 – but it’s US only for now

iOS 16.1 is now available for iPhone 8 and newer handsets, and it comes with an interesting carbon-saving feature that helps bolster Apple's eco-friendly credentials – and the company has now explained how it works.

In a support document, Apple states that when this feature is enabled, your iPhone gains an overview of the carbon emissions being used in your area, and iOS 16.1 will charge your device during times when cleaner energy production is being used.

It's an interesting feature, and it makes us wonder how this could expand to Apple's other devices.

A reduced carbon footprint for your MacBook Pro?

Macbook Pro 14-inch

(Image credit: TechRadar)

iPhones are one of the most repeatedly charged devices that many of us rely on every day, but most of us don't think about where the electricity we use to charge our iPhones comes from.

At the moment, this feature is only available to people in the US, though we hope it gets a global rollout soon. If you're in the US and you don't see Clean Energy Charging in your battery settings, you need to have Location Services enabled, alongside System Customization and Significant Locations. These can all be found within in Settings > Privacy & Security > Location Services > System Services.

It's too early to tell if the Clean Energy Charging feature will make a big difference in carbon emissions, but if it does, could we see it come to other Apple products, such as Macs and MacBooks?  With rumors that new M2 MacBook Pros could be arriving soon, it could be perfect timing for this feature to pop up in a future macOS Ventura update.

Apple recently published a press release, calling on its supply chain to fully decarbonize by 2030 and use fully-renewable sources, so it's clear that the company is getting serious about minimising the environmental impact of its products.

We're expecting the company to go harder in its renewable-energy efforts in the near future, further showing the industry how it can thrive in a clean-energy world while we enjoy sending memes to friends over iMessage.

TechRadar – All the latest technology news

Read More

Once you upgrade to Windows 11, you only have 10 days to revert to Windows 10

Windows 11 only offers you a 10-day timeframe to change your mind about the upgrade and revert to Windows 10.

This isn’t a new revelation, of course, but with more folks now moving to Windows 11 – given that Microsoft opened the upgrade floodgates a fortnight ago – we figured it was worth a reminder that you’re on a pretty tight deadline for making a decision about whether you want to stick with Windows 11.

The situation differs notably and substantially from Windows 10, whereby those upgrading from Windows 7 or 8.1 got 30 days grace to play around with the operating system, and move back to the old version if they decided it wasn’t for them.

In other words, Microsoft has reduced the rollback grace period from 30 days with Windows 10, to just 10 days with Windows 11.

After that time has expired, when you head over to the ‘Recovery’ options screen (search for it under Settings), the option to ‘Go Back’ – meaning to revert to the previous OS, Windows 10 – is greyed out. The only way to get back to Windows 10 at that point is to fully reinstall the OS on the PC, which is obviously quite a task compared to just clicking a button.


Analysis: Grabbing a disk image is worthwhile for this

The obvious problem here is that by narrowing down the reversion period, people who upgrade to Windows 11 and don’t hit any immediate hitches, but subsequently discover a nasty issue after a few weeks, no longer have the option to make a no-fuss switch back to Windows 10. They’re stuck.

And this is particularly galling seeing as the opportunity to revert remained open for a full month when folks were upgrading to Windows 10.

So, if you’re nervous about migrating to Windows 11 and that stingy trial time frame, as it were, then one thing you can do is make a backup image of your Windows 10 installation before you upgrade.

This can be achieved using software like Acronis True Image or Macrium Reflect (or another of the best disk cloning tools around), and with an image in place, if at any time you want to revert to that snapshot of your old OS, you can do so.

The key is to be prepared as this is something that must be done ahead of upgrading to Windows 11, obviously enough. In our book, it’s a worthwhile precaution for sure, particularly now Microsoft has whittled down the rollback period to an absolute minimum for reasons best known to the software giant.

Via ZDNet

TechRadar – All the latest technology news

Read More