You can now join a video call straight from Google Docs

Joining a Meet video call is now easier than ever thanks to a new feature that will allow users to join directly from Google Docs, Sheets or Slides.

The Google Workspace update allows users to join a video conferencing call with just a click, meaning there's no need to scrabble around for a calendar invite or email.

Going forward, Google Docs users will see a new icon next to the “Share” button, allowing them to join a Meet video call directly from their document.

Google Docs video calls

The new taskbar will house a full list of all the video calls and meetings a users has scheduled, including dates and times, with the join button showing once a meeting is live.

As mentioned, it will be present not just in Google Docs, but also Sheets and Slides, giving users multiple ways to join.

Google Docs join a Meet call

(Image credit: Google Workspace)

Google says this new approach will also allow users to have the content they are working on open and within sight whilst on a call, rather than needing to juggle multiple apps or browser windows.

The tool was first announced last month, but is now rolling out to all Google Workspace customers, as well as legacy G Suite Basic and Business users now. It will be on by default, with users starting to see the changes immediately.

“To help teams do their best work in the hybrid work world, as many of us begin a return to office, we continue to make enhancements to Google Meet to help ensure that video meetings are inclusive and collaborative no matter the location or device preference,” the entry in the Google Workspace update blog states.

 “We hope this feature makes it easier for everyone in the meeting to collaborate in real-time while having a conversation—all from the same tab.”

Google Meet is also set to soon receive a new picture-in-picture mode, which will allow Chrome users to bring up a floating meeting window that sits on top of other browser tabs.

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WWDC 2022 announced – what we expect to see from Apple’s event

Apple has announced its developer conference for June 6, where it's expected to announce iOS 16, macOS 13, and more for its iPhone, iPad, Watch, and Mac products.

The keynote conference where these updates will most likely be announced will also most likely be on June 6, which we'll be covering to give you all the updates as they arrive.

Similar to the last two years, WWDC will be going remote for the first week of June, but there are sure to be some surprises in store for both users and developers.

Unlike Google, Apple moved its WWDC conference to be a fully online event in 2020 due to the pandemic, rather than canceling it. Some were hoping to see a mix, similar to this year's Google IO of remote and in-person events, but Apple is understandably playing it safe for 2022.

We suspect Apple's CEO Tim Cook will kick off the keynote at 9AM / 6PM GMT on June 6 as before, which we expect will be free to stream.

See more

We won't know officially until the June 6 keynote what Apple intends to show off, but that's not stopping us from contemplating what we hope and expect to see from the company. Below, we'll predict Apple's software and hardware lineup for WWDC 2022, and explain how the virtual event will work.

LATEST NEWS

Apple’s WWDC 2022 is announced as an online-only event, similar to 2020 and 2021.

Cut to the chase

  • What is it? Apple’s yearly developer conference
  • When is it? June 6 – June 10, 2022
  • How can I register / how much does it cost? Free for everyone to watch throughout the week.

WWDC 2021 screenshot

(Image credit: Apple)

What are the WWDC 2022 dates?

Apple revealed that its developer conference would take place from Monday, June 6 through Friday, June 10. Apple regularly schedules its annual five-day conference for June, so it wasn't a surprise to expect to see WWDC around this time again.

WWDC 2021 screenshot

(Image credit: Apple)

Is WWDC 2022 online-only?

Apple normally holds WWDC and its subsequent developer sessions across the week in physical gatherings at the San Jose Convention Center in California, where COVID-19 restrictions on large events are slowly being lifted across the country. 

But with WWDC 2021 repeating the same plan as 2020, many had assumed that WWDC 2022 would follow in the same vein. This has turned out to be true, as you will be able to attend sessions and watch the keynote remotely.

How WWDC 2022 will work

In previous years, you could buy a pass to attend Apple's keynote on Monday, alongside being able to attend developer sessions, one-on-one demos with Apple engineers, and other events for professionals or hobbyists arranged by Apple enthusiasts around the event.

This year, most of those events look to be virtual and free again, with Apple announcing more details as the event gets closer, most likely through its WWDC app.

Some WWDC 2022 sessions will be free to all and rewatchable on-demand, as in previous years. But there will be other events that will be in person, and if you're there, will most likely require you to reserve a slot due to its popularity.

WWDC 2021 screenshot

(Image credit: Apple)

What to expect at WWDC 2022

Based on Apple's annual product and software calendar, plus all the leaks and rumors we've heard about, we have a general idea of what Tim Cook, Craig Federighi, and other Apple execs will discuss during the WWDC 2022 keynote on June 6. Here are the highlights:

WWDC 2021 screenshot

(Image credit: Apple)

iOS 16

Apple will almost certainly be introducing iOS 16 at WWDC, the next iteration of what powers the iPhone. Usually, a preview for developers is released the same day as it's made official, with a public beta for you to try a month later.

While we've spoken of our hopes to see some better customization options and a dedicated app to manage our AirTags, AirPods, and other peripherals, it seems like 2022 could be a maintenance year for iOS.

Cleaning up some corners of the software to make it leaner and faster would be a great angle for iOS 16, especially with rumors swirling about different designs that the iPhone 14 Pro could be showcasing soon.

@Angelo Libero Designs

(Image credit: Angelo Libero Designs)

macOS 13

Every year since 2012, Apple has announced a new version of the software that powers its Macs, and we expect the same for WWDC.

macOS 13 will be the next version, with another name to match the trend of naming previous versions after Californian landmarks. Our money is on 'Mammoth' for this year's version, especially as Apple trademarked the name, alongside Monterey at the start of 2021.

macOS gets the short straw in features compared to iOS, as it usually plays catchup – dark mode and a new look arrived in macOS Big Sur, one year after iOS gained these. Shortcuts also arrived in 2021, while it's been in iOS since 2019.

We expect the same to occur here, with widgets hopefully moving out of a sidebar, and onto your Mac desktop instead, alongside a hope for the fantastic Weather app from iOS 15 to see an appearance on macOS 13 as well.

Painting of a woolly mammoth

(Image credit: Wikimedia Commons)

'M2' Apple Silicon

Users were caught off-guard at Apple's March event, where another M1 variant was announced, the M1 Ultra, which is available to be used in its Mac Studio.

But WWDC 2020 was when Apple announced the move from Intel chips to Apple Silicon, and with the company making sure to mention in March that the M1 Ultra was the last chip of M1, the M2 looks all but certain to appear.

Expect the M2 chip to be more optimized compared to the M1, with a focus on better battery life and more cores for its GPU.

There are rumors that we could see it appear on a redesigned MacBook Air that could mirror the 2021 iMac, but whether we will also see this laptop at WWDC remains to be seen.

A black square ringed by rainbow light and the Apple logo and M2 in the center

(Image credit: Apple, with modification by TechRadar)

Less likely: Apple VR Headset and iCar

As WWDC is focused on developers, we don't expect to see new hardware appearing. Rather, we do see a better chance of the software for its rumored VR/AR headset to be showcased in some way, instead.

We've spoken of a rumored 'rOS' before that could power this wearable, and to demo what it's capable of for developers, before it's available to customers, could be a good opportunity to load up its App Store before it's available to buy.

The rumored name for the software of the rumored Apple VR/AR headset

(Image credit: Future)

Apple's car project has been one of its longest-running rumors in recent memory, allegedly called 'Project Titan' by the company.

There's still next to nothing that's leaked out, but Apple is at least investing millions into an automobile. It still feels too early for Apple to publicly acknowledge this project for 2022 – expect to hear something towards the end of the decade instead.

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WWDC 2022 announced – what we expect to see from Apple’s event

Apple has announced its developer conference for June 6, where it's expected to announce iOS 16, macOS 13, and more for its iPhone, iPad, Watch, and Mac products.

The keynote conference where these updates will most likely be announced will also most likely be on June 6, which we'll be covering to give you all the updates as they arrive.

Similar to the last two years, WWDC will be going remote for the first week of June, but there are sure to be some surprises in store for both users and developers.

Unlike Google, Apple moved its WWDC conference to be a fully online event in 2020 due to the pandemic, rather than canceling it. Some were hoping to see a mix, similar to this year's Google IO of remote and in-person events, but Apple is understandably playing it safe for 2022.

We suspect Apple's CEO Tim Cook will kick off the keynote at 9AM / 6PM GMT on June 6 as before, which we expect will be free to stream.

See more

We won't know officially until the June 6 keynote what Apple intends to show off, but that's not stopping us from contemplating what we hope and expect to see from the company. Below, we'll predict Apple's software and hardware lineup for WWDC 2022, and explain how the virtual event will work.

LATEST NEWS

Apple’s WWDC 2022 is announced as an online-only event, similar to 2020 and 2021.

Cut to the chase

  • What is it? Apple’s yearly developer conference
  • When is it? June 6 – June 10, 2022
  • How can I register / how much does it cost? Free for everyone to watch throughout the week.

WWDC 2021 screenshot

(Image credit: Apple)

What are the WWDC 2022 dates?

Apple revealed that its developer conference would take place from Monday, June 6 through Friday, June 10. Apple regularly schedules its annual five-day conference for June, so it wasn't a surprise to expect to see WWDC around this time again.

WWDC 2021 screenshot

(Image credit: Apple)

Is WWDC 2022 online-only?

Apple normally holds WWDC and its subsequent developer sessions across the week in physical gatherings at the San Jose Convention Center in California, where COVID-19 restrictions on large events are slowly being lifted across the country. 

But with WWDC 2021 repeating the same plan as 2020, many had assumed that WWDC 2022 would follow in the same vein. This has turned out to be true, as you will be able to attend sessions and watch the keynote remotely.

How WWDC 2022 will work

In previous years, you could buy a pass to attend Apple's keynote on Monday, alongside being able to attend developer sessions, one-on-one demos with Apple engineers, and other events for professionals or hobbyists arranged by Apple enthusiasts around the event.

This year, most of those events look to be virtual and free again, with Apple announcing more details as the event gets closer, most likely through its WWDC app.

Some WWDC 2022 sessions will be free to all and rewatchable on-demand, as in previous years. But there will be other events that will be in person, and if you're there, will most likely require you to reserve a slot due to its popularity.

WWDC 2021 screenshot

(Image credit: Apple)

What to expect at WWDC 2022

Based on Apple's annual product and software calendar, plus all the leaks and rumors we've heard about, we have a general idea of what Tim Cook, Craig Federighi, and other Apple execs will discuss during the WWDC 2022 keynote on June 6. Here are the highlights:

WWDC 2021 screenshot

(Image credit: Apple)

iOS 16

Apple will almost certainly be introducing iOS 16 at WWDC, the next iteration of what powers the iPhone. Usually, a preview for developers is released the same day as it's made official, with a public beta for you to try a month later.

While we've spoken of our hopes to see some better customization options and a dedicated app to manage our AirTags, AirPods, and other peripherals, it seems like 2022 could be a maintenance year for iOS.

Cleaning up some corners of the software to make it leaner and faster would be a great angle for iOS 16, especially with rumors swirling about different designs that the iPhone 14 Pro could be showcasing soon.

@Angelo Libero Designs

(Image credit: Angelo Libero Designs)

macOS 13

Every year since 2012, Apple has announced a new version of the software that powers its Macs, and we expect the same for WWDC.

macOS 13 will be the next version, with another name to match the trend of naming previous versions after Californian landmarks. Our money is on 'Mammoth' for this year's version, especially as Apple trademarked the name, alongside Monterey at the start of 2021.

macOS gets the short straw in features compared to iOS, as it usually plays catchup – dark mode and a new look arrived in macOS Big Sur, one year after iOS gained these. Shortcuts also arrived in 2021, while it's been in iOS since 2019.

We expect the same to occur here, with widgets hopefully moving out of a sidebar, and onto your Mac desktop instead, alongside a hope for the fantastic Weather app from iOS 15 to see an appearance on macOS 13 as well.

Painting of a woolly mammoth

(Image credit: Wikimedia Commons)

'M2' Apple Silicon

Users were caught off-guard at Apple's March event, where another M1 variant was announced, the M1 Ultra, which is available to be used in its Mac Studio.

But WWDC 2020 was when Apple announced the move from Intel chips to Apple Silicon, and with the company making sure to mention in March that the M1 Ultra was the last chip of M1, the M2 looks all but certain to appear.

Expect the M2 chip to be more optimized compared to the M1, with a focus on better battery life and more cores for its GPU.

There are rumors that we could see it appear on a redesigned MacBook Air that could mirror the 2021 iMac, but whether we will also see this laptop at WWDC remains to be seen.

A black square ringed by rainbow light and the Apple logo and M2 in the center

(Image credit: Apple, with modification by TechRadar)

Less likely: Apple VR Headset and iCar

As WWDC is focused on developers, we don't expect to see new hardware appearing. Rather, we do see a better chance of the software for its rumored VR/AR headset to be showcased in some way, instead.

We've spoken of a rumored 'rOS' before that could power this wearable, and to demo what it's capable of for developers, before it's available to customers, could be a good opportunity to load up its App Store before it's available to buy.

The rumored name for the software of the rumored Apple VR/AR headset

(Image credit: Future)

Apple's car project has been one of its longest-running rumors in recent memory, allegedly called 'Project Titan' by the company.

There's still next to nothing that's leaked out, but Apple is at least investing millions into an automobile. It still feels too early for Apple to publicly acknowledge this project for 2022 – expect to hear something towards the end of the decade instead.

TechRadar – All the latest technology news

Read More

WWDC 2022 is official for June 6 – expect to see iOS 16, M2, and more from Apple

After much speculation, Apple has announced its developer conference, WWDC, will be held in San Jose between June 6 and June 10, with a keynote being held on June 6, where it's expected to announce iOS 16, macOS 13, and more.

Mirroring previous years, the event will be fully remote, with the keynote being streamed on June 6, and developer sessions across the week will also be held remotely.

Apple's conference is usually where we will see updates to iOS, macOS, iPadOS, and its other software be showcased. Last year brought widgets to iPadOS 15, while we saw Focus be brought to iPadOS, iOS 15, watchOS, and macOS to help your productivity.

We expect the next versions to be announced, but we'll be covering everything that Apple announces, once June 6 arrives.

How you can take part in WWDC 2022

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WWDC has always been a week-long event, as Apple wants to communicate with its developers on the newest features that it hopes will benefit the apps that are across the App Store.

Regardless of going online-only in the past two years, the sessions have always been a helpful guide to developers, in talking to Apple engineers in solving some issues and being inspired to try out new features.

But there's also been plenty of events and apps held by Apple enthusiasts, whether they've been held around San Jose or as online events.

However, the first port of call would be Apple's Developer app. This will allow you to see which events you can keep track of, while also allowing you to download certain sessions to watch at a time that better suits you.

But if you're planning on visiting San Jose regardless, plenty of developers on Twitter will most likely be going too. And if you're a developer, see if you can take part in community sessions for when the next versions of iOS and macOS are announced, so you can brainstorm features and ideas for your apps.

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The best-hidden macOS and iOS Easter egg from PCalc is now its own app

You may have been using the popular calculator app PCalc for years, not realizing that there was a secret game hidden inside. Now, it's been separated as its own app, available to download for free from the App Store for iOS and macOS.

Called About by PCalc by developer James Thomson, you can manipulate the app's logo by flicking it around, changing the gravity, throwing bananas at it and even driving a car.

And if that's not enough, you can control all of this through a keyboard or gamepad… because why not?

Usually, 'About' screens in apps will show the team responsible for creating the app, with links to their social handles and even a tip jar to help reward them for their efforts. However, if you press a certain command in PCalc's about section, a fun hidden game pops up, and it's this game that has become a separate app.


Bananas, fire, gravity and cars

About by PCalc on macOS

(Image credit: TechRadar)

I've been a user of PCalc for years on iOS. It's an app that's tried to keep up with the new features that Apple brings out every year at WWDC, its developer conference.

Including customizable widgets in iOS 14 was particularly useful, and made the app a fair bit better than Apple's own calculator app. But it was PCalc's Easter egg that was the main reason why it stayed on my main home screen on my iPhone.

The About app doesn't have a purpose – I see it more like a fidget app. Something to play with as you're commuting on the subway or for when the Wi-Fi goes down.

But I've found my iPhone 13 Pro gets very hot if I use too much of the flame, light, and cereal effects, so be warned if you pass your device to kids who will most likely want to press every button repeatedly. However, using About on macOS with the M1 Pro chip in my MacBook Pro 14-inch (2021), I noticed there was barely any slowdown, and the fans still didn't turn on.

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Playing with my 8BitDo Pro 2 controller was also a surreal moment, where I could drive a car to a hidden castle on the macOS version.

Essentially, it's an app that makes no sense – its purpose is to be a fun distraction for whatever situation you may find yourself in. Some apps don't need a reason to stay on your home screen, they just need to be fun, and that's what this app has in droves.

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My one wish for iOS 16 is to fix FindMy and its broken notifications from iOS 15

Let me set the scene: I was walking back from a friend's house one evening, and I receive the first of two notifications that I've left my AirPods Pro somewhere, along with with an approximate address. However, after a frenzied check, I found they were still in my pocket.

This has happened numerous times before, ever since iOS 15 launched in September 2021. Even when my AirPods Pro were replaced the month after, the issue remains to this day – and it's a notification that can cause me anxiety in record time.

Having to quickly check my pockets or my bag to see if the AirPods case and two earphones are there can result in a frustrating swipe on my Apple Watch to be rid of the FindMy notification. It's got to the point where I'm tempted to remove my AirPods from the app completely.

Frankly, it's ridiculous that these false notifications are still occurring, especially as I was hoping for it to be fixed in iOS 15.4. But as it still remains, and the fact that it's not a hardware issue, what could it be?

One false notification is more than enough

FindMy showing missing notification on AirPods

(Image credit: TechRadar)

FindMy has been around since iOS 5, where it was previously called Find My Friends, and used as a way of keeping track of friends and family who would allow their devices to be followed through the app.

But in 2019 it was turned into FindMy, where you could look at all your devices registered to your Apple ID, and in 2020, with the introduction of AirTags, other products could be registered to the app.

I've never had an issue with Find My. In fact, I've found it to be a useful app to play a sound from my iPhone for when I'd lose it deep in the couch, for example. But my patience is starting to wear thin with these notifications.

The above image is when I received the final notification, after my walk home, where this appeared as I was sitting down at home, playing Fortnite.

Granted, I can go to my AirPods Pro in FindMy, go to 'Notify When Left Behind', and switch this off. But, what happens if I actually do lose my AIrPods?

It only takes one mistake to leave them behind, and as AirPods, bafflingly, don't have an AirTag or a speaker built into their cases, it can be tricky to find them, ironically.

This feature works by measuring the proximity between your iPhone and your AirPods, and will send a notification with its last known location. But far too often now, I'll get these as I'm walking home, or on a train, or just sitting down.

This isn't good. It reinforces a growing narrative that the software quality of some Apple apps is degrading, and one of the worst things that a user can feel when using a product is frustration.

This is what's happening now to FindMy, and hopefully, once iOS 16 is announced, we'll see this feature either fixed or replaced with a better method for judging proximity between devices.

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My one wish for iOS 16 is to fix FindMy and its broken notifications from iOS 15

Let me set the scene: I was walking back from a friend's house one evening, and I receive the first of two notifications that I've left my AirPods Pro somewhere, along with with an approximate address. However, after a frenzied check, I found they were still in my pocket.

This has happened numerous times before, ever since iOS 15 launched in September 2021. Even when my AirPods Pro were replaced the month after, the issue remains to this day – and it's a notification that can cause me anxiety in record time.

Having to quickly check my pockets or my bag to see if the AirPods case and two earphones are there can result in a frustrating swipe on my Apple Watch to be rid of the FindMy notification. It's got to the point where I'm tempted to remove my AirPods from the app completely.

Frankly, it's ridiculous that these false notifications are still occurring, especially as I was hoping for it to be fixed in iOS 15.4. But as it still remains, and the fact that it's not a hardware issue, what could it be?

One false notification is more than enough

FindMy showing missing notification on AirPods

(Image credit: TechRadar)

FindMy has been around since iOS 5, where it was previously called Find My Friends, and used as a way of keeping track of friends and family who would allow their devices to be followed through the app.

But in 2019 it was turned into FindMy, where you could look at all your devices registered to your Apple ID, and in 2020, with the introduction of AirTags, other products could be registered to the app.

I've never had an issue with Find My. In fact, I've found it to be a useful app to play a sound from my iPhone for when I'd lose it deep in the couch, for example. But my patience is starting to wear thin with these notifications.

The above image is when I received the final notification, after my walk home, where this appeared as I was sitting down at home, playing Fortnite.

Granted, I can go to my AirPods Pro in FindMy, go to 'Notify When Left Behind', and switch this off. But, what happens if I actually do lose my AIrPods?

It only takes one mistake to leave them behind, and as AirPods, bafflingly, don't have an AirTag or a speaker built into their cases, it can be tricky to find them, ironically.

This feature works by measuring the proximity between your iPhone and your AirPods, and will send a notification with its last known location. But far too often now, I'll get these as I'm walking home, or on a train, or just sitting down.

This isn't good. It reinforces a growing narrative that the software quality of some Apple apps is degrading, and one of the worst things that a user can feel when using a product is frustration.

This is what's happening now to FindMy, and hopefully, once iOS 16 is announced, we'll see this feature either fixed or replaced with a better method for judging proximity between devices.

TechRadar – All the latest technology news

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