WWDC 2022 announced – what we expect to see from Apple’s event

Apple has announced its developer conference for June 6, where it's expected to announce iOS 16, macOS 13, and more for its iPhone, iPad, Watch, and Mac products.

The keynote conference where these updates will most likely be announced will also most likely be on June 6, which we'll be covering to give you all the updates as they arrive.

Similar to the last two years, WWDC will be going remote for the first week of June, but there are sure to be some surprises in store for both users and developers.

Unlike Google, Apple moved its WWDC conference to be a fully online event in 2020 due to the pandemic, rather than canceling it. Some were hoping to see a mix, similar to this year's Google IO of remote and in-person events, but Apple is understandably playing it safe for 2022.

We suspect Apple's CEO Tim Cook will kick off the keynote at 9AM / 6PM GMT on June 6 as before, which we expect will be free to stream.

See more

We won't know officially until the June 6 keynote what Apple intends to show off, but that's not stopping us from contemplating what we hope and expect to see from the company. Below, we'll predict Apple's software and hardware lineup for WWDC 2022, and explain how the virtual event will work.

LATEST NEWS

Apple’s WWDC 2022 is announced as an online-only event, similar to 2020 and 2021.

Cut to the chase

  • What is it? Apple’s yearly developer conference
  • When is it? June 6 – June 10, 2022
  • How can I register / how much does it cost? Free for everyone to watch throughout the week.

WWDC 2021 screenshot

(Image credit: Apple)

What are the WWDC 2022 dates?

Apple revealed that its developer conference would take place from Monday, June 6 through Friday, June 10. Apple regularly schedules its annual five-day conference for June, so it wasn't a surprise to expect to see WWDC around this time again.

WWDC 2021 screenshot

(Image credit: Apple)

Is WWDC 2022 online-only?

Apple normally holds WWDC and its subsequent developer sessions across the week in physical gatherings at the San Jose Convention Center in California, where COVID-19 restrictions on large events are slowly being lifted across the country. 

But with WWDC 2021 repeating the same plan as 2020, many had assumed that WWDC 2022 would follow in the same vein. This has turned out to be true, as you will be able to attend sessions and watch the keynote remotely.

How WWDC 2022 will work

In previous years, you could buy a pass to attend Apple's keynote on Monday, alongside being able to attend developer sessions, one-on-one demos with Apple engineers, and other events for professionals or hobbyists arranged by Apple enthusiasts around the event.

This year, most of those events look to be virtual and free again, with Apple announcing more details as the event gets closer, most likely through its WWDC app.

Some WWDC 2022 sessions will be free to all and rewatchable on-demand, as in previous years. But there will be other events that will be in person, and if you're there, will most likely require you to reserve a slot due to its popularity.

WWDC 2021 screenshot

(Image credit: Apple)

What to expect at WWDC 2022

Based on Apple's annual product and software calendar, plus all the leaks and rumors we've heard about, we have a general idea of what Tim Cook, Craig Federighi, and other Apple execs will discuss during the WWDC 2022 keynote on June 6. Here are the highlights:

WWDC 2021 screenshot

(Image credit: Apple)

iOS 16

Apple will almost certainly be introducing iOS 16 at WWDC, the next iteration of what powers the iPhone. Usually, a preview for developers is released the same day as it's made official, with a public beta for you to try a month later.

While we've spoken of our hopes to see some better customization options and a dedicated app to manage our AirTags, AirPods, and other peripherals, it seems like 2022 could be a maintenance year for iOS.

Cleaning up some corners of the software to make it leaner and faster would be a great angle for iOS 16, especially with rumors swirling about different designs that the iPhone 14 Pro could be showcasing soon.

@Angelo Libero Designs

(Image credit: Angelo Libero Designs)

macOS 13

Every year since 2012, Apple has announced a new version of the software that powers its Macs, and we expect the same for WWDC.

macOS 13 will be the next version, with another name to match the trend of naming previous versions after Californian landmarks. Our money is on 'Mammoth' for this year's version, especially as Apple trademarked the name, alongside Monterey at the start of 2021.

macOS gets the short straw in features compared to iOS, as it usually plays catchup – dark mode and a new look arrived in macOS Big Sur, one year after iOS gained these. Shortcuts also arrived in 2021, while it's been in iOS since 2019.

We expect the same to occur here, with widgets hopefully moving out of a sidebar, and onto your Mac desktop instead, alongside a hope for the fantastic Weather app from iOS 15 to see an appearance on macOS 13 as well.

Painting of a woolly mammoth

(Image credit: Wikimedia Commons)

'M2' Apple Silicon

Users were caught off-guard at Apple's March event, where another M1 variant was announced, the M1 Ultra, which is available to be used in its Mac Studio.

But WWDC 2020 was when Apple announced the move from Intel chips to Apple Silicon, and with the company making sure to mention in March that the M1 Ultra was the last chip of M1, the M2 looks all but certain to appear.

Expect the M2 chip to be more optimized compared to the M1, with a focus on better battery life and more cores for its GPU.

There are rumors that we could see it appear on a redesigned MacBook Air that could mirror the 2021 iMac, but whether we will also see this laptop at WWDC remains to be seen.

A black square ringed by rainbow light and the Apple logo and M2 in the center

(Image credit: Apple, with modification by TechRadar)

Less likely: Apple VR Headset and iCar

As WWDC is focused on developers, we don't expect to see new hardware appearing. Rather, we do see a better chance of the software for its rumored VR/AR headset to be showcased in some way, instead.

We've spoken of a rumored 'rOS' before that could power this wearable, and to demo what it's capable of for developers, before it's available to customers, could be a good opportunity to load up its App Store before it's available to buy.

The rumored name for the software of the rumored Apple VR/AR headset

(Image credit: Future)

Apple's car project has been one of its longest-running rumors in recent memory, allegedly called 'Project Titan' by the company.

There's still next to nothing that's leaked out, but Apple is at least investing millions into an automobile. It still feels too early for Apple to publicly acknowledge this project for 2022 – expect to hear something towards the end of the decade instead.

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WWDC 2022 announced – what we expect to see from Apple’s event

Apple has announced its developer conference for June 6, where it's expected to announce iOS 16, macOS 13, and more for its iPhone, iPad, Watch, and Mac products.

The keynote conference where these updates will most likely be announced will also most likely be on June 6, which we'll be covering to give you all the updates as they arrive.

Similar to the last two years, WWDC will be going remote for the first week of June, but there are sure to be some surprises in store for both users and developers.

Unlike Google, Apple moved its WWDC conference to be a fully online event in 2020 due to the pandemic, rather than canceling it. Some were hoping to see a mix, similar to this year's Google IO of remote and in-person events, but Apple is understandably playing it safe for 2022.

We suspect Apple's CEO Tim Cook will kick off the keynote at 9AM / 6PM GMT on June 6 as before, which we expect will be free to stream.

See more

We won't know officially until the June 6 keynote what Apple intends to show off, but that's not stopping us from contemplating what we hope and expect to see from the company. Below, we'll predict Apple's software and hardware lineup for WWDC 2022, and explain how the virtual event will work.

LATEST NEWS

Apple’s WWDC 2022 is announced as an online-only event, similar to 2020 and 2021.

Cut to the chase

  • What is it? Apple’s yearly developer conference
  • When is it? June 6 – June 10, 2022
  • How can I register / how much does it cost? Free for everyone to watch throughout the week.

WWDC 2021 screenshot

(Image credit: Apple)

What are the WWDC 2022 dates?

Apple revealed that its developer conference would take place from Monday, June 6 through Friday, June 10. Apple regularly schedules its annual five-day conference for June, so it wasn't a surprise to expect to see WWDC around this time again.

WWDC 2021 screenshot

(Image credit: Apple)

Is WWDC 2022 online-only?

Apple normally holds WWDC and its subsequent developer sessions across the week in physical gatherings at the San Jose Convention Center in California, where COVID-19 restrictions on large events are slowly being lifted across the country. 

But with WWDC 2021 repeating the same plan as 2020, many had assumed that WWDC 2022 would follow in the same vein. This has turned out to be true, as you will be able to attend sessions and watch the keynote remotely.

How WWDC 2022 will work

In previous years, you could buy a pass to attend Apple's keynote on Monday, alongside being able to attend developer sessions, one-on-one demos with Apple engineers, and other events for professionals or hobbyists arranged by Apple enthusiasts around the event.

This year, most of those events look to be virtual and free again, with Apple announcing more details as the event gets closer, most likely through its WWDC app.

Some WWDC 2022 sessions will be free to all and rewatchable on-demand, as in previous years. But there will be other events that will be in person, and if you're there, will most likely require you to reserve a slot due to its popularity.

WWDC 2021 screenshot

(Image credit: Apple)

What to expect at WWDC 2022

Based on Apple's annual product and software calendar, plus all the leaks and rumors we've heard about, we have a general idea of what Tim Cook, Craig Federighi, and other Apple execs will discuss during the WWDC 2022 keynote on June 6. Here are the highlights:

WWDC 2021 screenshot

(Image credit: Apple)

iOS 16

Apple will almost certainly be introducing iOS 16 at WWDC, the next iteration of what powers the iPhone. Usually, a preview for developers is released the same day as it's made official, with a public beta for you to try a month later.

While we've spoken of our hopes to see some better customization options and a dedicated app to manage our AirTags, AirPods, and other peripherals, it seems like 2022 could be a maintenance year for iOS.

Cleaning up some corners of the software to make it leaner and faster would be a great angle for iOS 16, especially with rumors swirling about different designs that the iPhone 14 Pro could be showcasing soon.

@Angelo Libero Designs

(Image credit: Angelo Libero Designs)

macOS 13

Every year since 2012, Apple has announced a new version of the software that powers its Macs, and we expect the same for WWDC.

macOS 13 will be the next version, with another name to match the trend of naming previous versions after Californian landmarks. Our money is on 'Mammoth' for this year's version, especially as Apple trademarked the name, alongside Monterey at the start of 2021.

macOS gets the short straw in features compared to iOS, as it usually plays catchup – dark mode and a new look arrived in macOS Big Sur, one year after iOS gained these. Shortcuts also arrived in 2021, while it's been in iOS since 2019.

We expect the same to occur here, with widgets hopefully moving out of a sidebar, and onto your Mac desktop instead, alongside a hope for the fantastic Weather app from iOS 15 to see an appearance on macOS 13 as well.

Painting of a woolly mammoth

(Image credit: Wikimedia Commons)

'M2' Apple Silicon

Users were caught off-guard at Apple's March event, where another M1 variant was announced, the M1 Ultra, which is available to be used in its Mac Studio.

But WWDC 2020 was when Apple announced the move from Intel chips to Apple Silicon, and with the company making sure to mention in March that the M1 Ultra was the last chip of M1, the M2 looks all but certain to appear.

Expect the M2 chip to be more optimized compared to the M1, with a focus on better battery life and more cores for its GPU.

There are rumors that we could see it appear on a redesigned MacBook Air that could mirror the 2021 iMac, but whether we will also see this laptop at WWDC remains to be seen.

A black square ringed by rainbow light and the Apple logo and M2 in the center

(Image credit: Apple, with modification by TechRadar)

Less likely: Apple VR Headset and iCar

As WWDC is focused on developers, we don't expect to see new hardware appearing. Rather, we do see a better chance of the software for its rumored VR/AR headset to be showcased in some way, instead.

We've spoken of a rumored 'rOS' before that could power this wearable, and to demo what it's capable of for developers, before it's available to customers, could be a good opportunity to load up its App Store before it's available to buy.

The rumored name for the software of the rumored Apple VR/AR headset

(Image credit: Future)

Apple's car project has been one of its longest-running rumors in recent memory, allegedly called 'Project Titan' by the company.

There's still next to nothing that's leaked out, but Apple is at least investing millions into an automobile. It still feels too early for Apple to publicly acknowledge this project for 2022 – expect to hear something towards the end of the decade instead.

TechRadar – All the latest technology news

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Apple March Event – if peek wasn’t a typo, what does it mean?

With Apple's March event now confirmed and rumored to feature a new iPhone SE 3, a new iPad Air, and possibly a new M1 Mac, fans are already trying to find clues in the invite that was sent out on Tuesday, March 2.

This is nothing new. For years, Apple has sent out invites that have suggested what the events may show off. Last year hinted towards 'Hyperspeed', which turned out to be the new M1 Pro and M1 Max MacBook Pro laptops.

Going way back to 2012, when invites were sent out for the iPhone 5 event, a shadow of a number 5 was as subtle as a sledgehammer that a new iPhone was on its way.

iPhone 5 invite

(Image credit: Apple)

But since the March invite was sent out, many are wondering why Apple chose the word 'Peek' instead of 'Peak' in the invite when it alluded to 'Peek performance'.

While it's extremely unlikely that it's a typo for a company like Apple, the word gives its customers an idea as to what March 8 could entail.

Is there a difference in Peak and Peek with Apple?

The Oxford Dictionary defines 'Peak' as:

Reach the highest point, either of a specified value or at a specified time.

In other words, it's the absolute highest that something could reach, either in how fast a machine can go, like an M1 chip from Apple, or how a 5G chip could reach new highs for an iPhone SE model, as that's a line that has yet to see the benefits of 5G.

But it's when you look at 'Peek' in the Dictionary that things become interesting:

To look or glance quickly or furtively, especially through a small opening or from a concealed location; peep; peer.

To me, this signals that we're going to see something else that goes beyond the rumors, and reminds me of a time back in 2006, when Steven Jobs was on stage.

We've been here before

Steve Jobs demoing Apple TV

(Image credit: Apple)

Apple's co-founder was on stage in 2006, showcasing games for the iPod Video, a new iPod nano line, and iTunes offering movies as well as TV shows.

But there was One More Thing, an aspect that Jobs was known to do from time to time at events. These would showcase an update to an existing product, or something completely out of the blue. This time, it was a sneak peek at the Apple TV, first called iTV.

Jobs would demo the media box in his own way that's become iconic now, communicating the benefits to everyone, but making it clear that it was a preview of what was to come.

It was rare that this happened, as Apple likes to announce products that are almost ready to go, even in 2006. But the company had stated since that event that Apple TV was a hobby, it was a testing ground.

In 2022, we're about to see another sneak peek, which makes me suspect we're going to see a new Mac, possibly a Mac Pro. This may be a product that's going to launch towards the end of the year with an Apple Silicon chip that's not quite ready for now.

Peak and peek can mean the same for Apple – it could offer a sneak peek of its highest-performing Mac, and the peak of the M1 chip, but it's simply not ready to be sold for now.

I've enjoyed using my M1 Pro MacBook Pro since October, but there's some Apple users I know of who want a Mac that's not constrained by being on a battery – they want pure power with no compromise. There are plenty of wallets ready to splurge on a Mac with Apple Silicon that's powered only by a cable, not a battery.

However, despite the references to 'peek', I don't see a augmented reality headset appearing next week, as some people are hoping for, mainly due to the fact that a new category for Apple doesn't fit a March event. A new category needs its own space, and for something for its developers to take in and see how it fits for their apps, which is why I believe that there's more chance of it appearing at WWDC this year.

We don't have long to wait for this, but if you're hoping to see a headset, this year's WWDC, once it's official, could be your best bet to see the Apple wearable.

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PS5 games reveal live blog: we’ll be reporting live on Sony’s The Future of Gaming event

The PS5 games reveal is imminent, and we're running a live blog throughout today's event, which Sony is calling The Future of Gaming. Starting at 1PM PDT / 9PM BST / 4PM EDT, we'll get our first look at PS5 games coming to the console at launch and likely beyond. Here's how to watch the PS5 games reveal live stream, so you can follow along. 

During this event, we expect to see an array of new game announcements and reveals, with PS5 exclusives debuted for the first time, among other games from third-party publishers and developers. The Future of Gaming will run slightly longer than an hour, Sony has confirmed. 

What's being revealed is still a total mystery. Even with a week's delay from the original intended date of June 4, seemingly nothing has leaked from what we're going to see today. We don't expect to see the console itself today, or to learn the PS5 price, but for the focus to instead be on games.

Below, we'll be live blogging the PS5 games reveal event all day, up until the end of the live stream. 

PS5 games reveal live blog

All times in Pacific Daylight time (PDT).

09.00 – Which games will be revealed today? In terms of Sony's own developers, logic points towards Horizon Zero Dawn 2, since the first game is more than three years old, it sold a bucketload of copies and has theoretically had enough time for a sequel to be made. Guerrilla has a reputation for being a developer that showcases PlayStation technology at its best. We think it's still slightly too early for God of War 2 and Spider-Man 2, but we're willing to be surprised. A new Gran Turismo is rumored based on a recent trademark filing

A Demon's Souls remake from port specialists BluePoint Games is also expected. Other, wilder rumors point towards a new Silent Hill game, and possibly Resident Evil 8, too.

08.33 – For context, the PS4 was greeted with game reveals from both Sony and third-party publishers and developers when the console was unveiled in 2013. They included games like Killzone: Shadow Fall, Knack and Driveclub, and key titles from other publishers like Destiny and Watch Dogs. 

It's likely we'll see a similar mix here, as publishers use this platform to get people excited about what they have planned for these new consoles. 

07.55 – Hello there! Today is the day of the PS5 games reveal. The Future of Gaming is a 'digital showcase' that Sony has said "will run for a bit more than an hour". While the livestream today will be broadcast in 1080p 30fps to ease the production process for Sony's staff, a lot of whom are still working from home, it's pointed out the games will look far superior on 4K TVs.

This is arguably the most exciting reveal in the next-gen console wars, and we're hoping that Sony doesn't pull any punches with revealing its biggest upcoming projects. Microsoft, of course, did its first gameplay reveal last month, and it was a little too lean for some of those watching at home, with bigger Xbox Series X games being saved for a separate reveal in July.

We predict Sony will counter-program that, and bring a lot of big guns to the fore, both from its own developers and publishers it's partnered up with.

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